Black Death-type bacteria found in trash

May 7, 2007

Bacteria from the same family as the Black Death was recently found inside British trash cans that are only emptied once every two weeks.

A health hazards study found among some of the trash cans collected every 14 days, a strain of bacteria eerily similar to that of the one that killed 75 million people during the Middle Ages, The Daily Mail said Monday.

The study found some of the bacteria found in the receptacles were from the exact family from which the yersinia pestis strain originated centuries ago.

Such troubling findings were included in the study's report, which suggested garbage collection in certain areas of Britain be increased to prevent potential health hazards.

"As we endeavor to drive the population to meet national and local recycling targets with a system of biweekly curbside collection, the potential biohazards associated should not be overlooked," the report from the University of Northampton's SITA Center said.

The Daily Mail said that the center recommended more stringent garbage collection procedures, as well as advancements in refuse containment and deposition.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Humans passing drug resistance to animals in protected Africa, study says

Related Stories

Brain's immune system triggers frontotemporal dementia

April 22, 2016

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), the second most common cause of dementia in people under 65, may be triggered by a defect in immune cells called microglia that causes them to consume the brain's synaptic connections, according ...

Recommended for you

Want to exercise more? Get yourself some competition

October 27, 2016

Imagine you're a CEO trying to get your employees to exercise. Most health incentive programs have an array of tools—pamphlets, websites, pedometers, coaching, team activities, step challenges, money—but what actually ...

Sleep loss tied to changes of the gut microbiota in humans

October 25, 2016

Results from a new clinical study conducted at Uppsala University suggest that curtailing sleep alters the abundance of bacterial gut species that have previously been linked to compromised human metabolic health. The new ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.