Canned green beans are recalled

August 2, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported a nationwide recall Thursday of French Style Green Beans sold under various brand names.

Lakeside Foods Inc. of Manitowoc, Wis., initiated the voluntary recall of 15,000 cases of 14.5-ounce cans of the beans after determining some cans might have been underprocessed and some might have leaked, posing the risk of botulism, a potentially fatal form of food poisoning.

The recalled product has can codes EAA5247, EAA5257, EAA267, EAA5277, EAB5247, EAB5257, ECA5207, ECA5217, ECA5227, ECA5297, ECB5207, ECAB5217, ECB5227 and ECB5307.

The canned beans were distributed in Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and Canada.

The beans were sold under the brand names Albertson's Happy Harvest, Best Choice, Food Club, Bogopa, Valu Time, Hill Country Fare, HEB, Laura Lynn, Kroger, North Pride, Schnucks, Shop N Save, Shoppers Valu, Cub Foods, Dierbergs, Flavorite, IGA, Best Choice and Thrifty Maid.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 800-466-3834 Ext 4090. Codes and label information are available at www.lakesidefoods.com.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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