Cell phone may hurt child's health

October 9, 2007

Professor Kjell Mild of Sweden's Orbero University said young children are more at risk when using cell phones because of their thinner skulls.

He added that using cell phones for more than 10 years increases the risk of brain cancer, and thinner skulls and developing nervous systems make kids particularly vulnerable to tumors, Britain's Telegraph reported Monday.

"I find it quite strange to see so many official presentations saying that there is no risk. There are strong indications that something happens after 10 years," said Mild.

His study suggests that 10 years is the minimum period needed by cancers to develop.

Just one month before Mild released his study, a separate piece of research funded by the government and cell phone industry found there was only a "very faint hint" of long-term mobile phones use causing brain tumors.

Now, the Mobile Telecommunications and Health Research program has been accused of failing to investigate the effect cell phone use has on tumors for periods of 10-years and up.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Program helps teens 'get the message' about distracted driving

Related Stories

Program helps teens 'get the message' about distracted driving

November 28, 2016

A program to educate teens about distracted driving—including a tour of a hospital trauma center and testimony from a trauma survivor—can increase awareness of the dangers of texting, cell phone use, and other distractions ...

Why batteries have started catching fire so often

November 11, 2016

All our lives we have relied on batteries in everything from mobile phones and cars to hand torches, but confidence in the technology has deteriorated of late. Many airline passengers have had to surrender their Samsung Galaxy ...

Huge quake exposes problems in how New Zealand prepares

November 19, 2016

The huge earthquake that hit New Zealand this past week, buckling roads, uplifting sections of coastline and killing two people, also exposed problems in how the country monitors its earthquake risk and prepares for tsunamis. ...

Using satellite images to better target vaccination

October 7, 2016

Satellite images that capture short-term changes in population size in communities in the developing world can help vaccination campaigns achieve more complete coverage to help prevent and control disease outbreaks. A team ...

Recommended for you

Baby teethers soothe, but many contain low levels of BPA

December 7, 2016

Bisphenol-A (BPA), parabens and antimicrobials are widely used in personal care products and plastics. The U.S. and other governments have banned or restricted some of these compounds' use in certain products for babies and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.