New malaria drug works in infants

October 19, 2007

Scientists say a new malaria vaccine being tested in Mozambique was successful in protecting infants less than 1 year old.

The study, published in The Lancet, was intended to show the safety of the vaccine. GlaxoSmithKline researchers also found that the full course of three shots reduced the risk of catching malaria by 65 percent, The New York Times said.

The efficacy data is consistent with the estimate of 45 percent reduction in new infections reported in a 2004 trial in Mozambique among children one to four years old, GlaxoSmithKline said Thursday in a release.

"We're now a step closer to the realization of a vaccine that can protect African infants," said Dr. Pedro Alonso, the University of Barcelona professor who leads clinical trials of the vaccine.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Malaria vaccine fails to work after four years

Related Stories

Malaria vaccine fails to work after four years

March 20, 2013

A new vaccine that has raised hopes of becoming a potent new tool in the battle against malaria seems to stop working in children after four years, according to research published Wednesday.

Clinical trial of malaria vaccine begins in Africa

May 25, 2011

The vaccine, RTS,S, developed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Biologicals and PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI), is currently in phase III clinical trials and has previously reduced episodes of malaria in infants and young children ...

Malaria vaccine a letdown for infants (Update)

November 9, 2012

An experimental malaria vaccine once thought promising is turning out to be a disappointment, with a new study showing it is only about 30 percent effective at protecting infants from the killer disease.

Recommended for you

Universal flu vaccine designed by scientists

September 30, 2016

An international team of scientists have designed a new generation of universal flu vaccines to protect against future global pandemics that could kill millions.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.