Relationship between prostate information and lower urinary-tract symptoms evident

November 13, 2008

The REDUCE (Reduction by DUtasteride of prostate Cancer Events) trial is a 4-year, phase-III placebo-controlled study that evaluates whether the drug dutasteride decreases the risk of biopsy-detectable prostate cancer. Dutasteride is a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, a drug that inhibits the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a hormone that may cause benign prostatic obstruction. The trial involves men with a negative prostate biopsy. The men were given either dutasteride or a placebo and followed for 4 years.

According to Dr Curtis Nickel, the lead researcher in the trial: "The data from the entrance biopsy have enabled additional investigations to be made, including examination of the relationship between prostate inflammation and LUTS."

The study is remarkable for its scope, which includes data on 8,224 men. A majority of participants had chronic inflammation at baseline. Total IPSS (International Prostate Symptom Score; the most widely used gauge of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with an enlarging prostate) and subscores were higher in the group of patients with chronic inflammation at baseline compared to those with no chronic inflammation. The differences were small but statistically significant. A regression analysis was performed. It revealed that higher values of age and average chronic inflammation were significantly associated with higher IPSS scores.

According to Dr Nickel, "The study entry criteria that selected older men and decreased enrollment of men with a greater degree of inflammation and LUTS may have limited the strength of the relationship between the degree of chronic inflammation and LUTS. It may actually be stronger."

The impact of baseline prostate inflammation on the progression of LUTS and/or associated complications will be determined during a 4-year follow-up study.

Source: Elsevier

Explore further: Research uncovers defender against cancer-promoting liver damage

Related Stories

Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer

April 18, 2014

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers ...

Inflammation in prostate may reduce cancer risk

December 9, 2013

Doctors at the North Shore-LIJ Health System have discovered that increased inflammation in the prostate may predict reduced risk for prostate cancer. The findings are published online in Cancer.

Overweight causes hazardous inflammations

August 25, 2014

Researchers have found a possible molecular explanation for why overweight is harmful. This new knowledge may provide new drugs for heart attack, stroke, cancer and chronic intestinal inflammation.

Recommended for you


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.