Similar long-term mortality risks in men with type 2 diabetes and men with cardiovascular disease

January 5, 2009

Men with type 2 diabetes and men with previous heart attack or stroke had a 3 to 4 fold risk of cardiovascular death compared to men without either disease in the years following the first acute event, according to a study in CMAJ.

The study underscores the high risk of diabetes, as "men with type 2 diabetes and no previous cardiovascular disease had a 3-fold cardiovascular mortality risk compared with men with neither cardiovascular disease nor diabetes at the beginning of the follow-up," write Dr. Gilles Dagenais and colleagues from Laval University and the University of Montreal.

However, the study was limited to white men and diabetes was self-reported in two-thirds of cases.

During the first five years, men with type 2 diabetes had a lower risk for cardiovascular mortality compared to men with previous heart attack or stroke and without diabetes but in the long term the 2 groups had similar mortality risks.

These findings underscore the need for prevention and optimal management of diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

Paper: www.cmaj.ca/press/pg40.pdf>

Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal

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