Childhood obesity linked to increased risk of adult cardiovascular and metabolic disorders

November 19, 2010

Mounting evidence linking childhood obesity to an increasing risk of obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and other cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in adulthood is clearly presented in a comprehensive review article in the current issue of Childhood Obesity, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Authors Megan Moriarty-Kelsey, MD and Stephen Daniels, MD, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, caution that the rising prevalence of obesity in children will lead to higher obesity rates in the adult population, resulting in a greater health burden caused by obesity-related metabolic and cardiovascular complications. In fact, obese children may already exhibit early signs of disorders such as hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, and .

In the article entitled " is the Fuel That Fires Adult Metabolic Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Disease," the authors emphasize the importance of prevention and early intervention for childhood obesity. This not only minimizes risk of future disease, but also prevents the occurrence of disorders once thought of as conditions of adulthood that have become increasingly common in children, such as and fatty liver disease.

More information: The article is available free online.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Some breastfeeding advice worth ditching: US task force

October 25, 2016

A review of scientific evidence on breastfeeding out Tuesday found that some long-held advice is worth ditching, including that babies should avoid pacifiers and moms should breastfeed exclusively in the first days after ...

Sleep loss tied to changes of the gut microbiota in humans

October 25, 2016

Results from a new clinical study conducted at Uppsala University suggest that curtailing sleep alters the abundance of bacterial gut species that have previously been linked to compromised human metabolic health. The new ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.