Plain cigarette packets could help stop people taking up smoking

Plain cigarette packets could help stop people taking up smoking

Plain cigarette packaging could help prevent people taking up the habit but would have little effect on those who already smoke on a daily basis, according to new research from the UK Centre for Tobacco Studies (UKCTCS), which has bases at the Universities of Bristol and Bath.

The researchers monitored the eye movements of non-smokers, light smokers and daily smokers who were asked to look at non-branded cigarette packets that showed only the health warning as compared to branded packets with identical health warnings.

The results showed that the eyes of non-smokers and light smokers were drawn to the health warnings on plain packets more than on branded packets, suggesting that plain packaging enhances attention to health warnings.  Existing smokers did not seem to be affected by packaging modifications.

Professor Marcus Munafò from the University of Bristol, who led the research said: “In this study we assessed the impact of plain packaging on visual attention towards health warning information and brand information on branded and plain cigarette packs, using eye tracking technology.

“This technology provides a direct measure of eye gaze location and therefore the focus of visual attention.  It is plausible that the more someone looks at the health warnings, for example, the more likely those health warnings are going to be read and understood, with a subsequent impact on behaviour.”

Tobacco marketing has been banned in many countries as it encourages the uptake of smoking and makes it harder for smokers to quit.  In response, the has focused on unregulated marketing channels, including packaging, as a way of promoting its products.

The introduction of plain packaging has been proposed to address the issue of tobacco promotion, meaning every packet would be the same shape and colour, with all branding removed apart from a standard typeface, colour and size with all relevant legal markings, including health warnings.

Professor Linda Bauld, one of the authors of the article, said: “The UK government has committed to consulting on introducing plain packaging in the future and this study makes a useful contribution to existing evidence. Plain packaging will make appear more prominent and strengthen their impact.  This will reduce the role of the pack as a tobacco promotion tool and prevent the use of labels or elements of the pack potentially being used to deceive about the dangers of cigarette smoking.”

The move to remove branding from cigarette packets is already being introduced in Australia from next year.  The tobacco industry has argued that there is no evidence to support the move and is campaigning against it.  The UKCTCS study provides important support for the Australian government’s introduction of plain packaging as well as demonstrating exactly why the industry is fighting these plans so desperately.

The article will be published online by the scientific journal Addiction on 11 April 2011.

More information: 'Plain Packaging Increases Visual Attention to Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs in Non-Smokers and Weekly Smokers but not Daily Smokers' by Munafò M.R., Roberts N., Bauld L. and Leonards U. in Addiction.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Britain considering plain cigarette packs

Nov 21, 2010

Tobacco companies could be forced to sell cigarettes in plain grey or brown packaging in Britain in an attempt to deter youngsters from taking up smoking, the health secretary suggested Sunday.

Australia proposes tough cigarette packaging rules

Apr 07, 2011

(AP) -- Tobacco companies in Australia will be forced to strip all logos from their cigarette packages and replace them with graphic images such as cancer-riddled mouths and sickly children under legislation unveiled Thursday ...

Do cigarette warning labels work -- results from 4 countries

Feb 06, 2007

As the second leading cause of death in the world, cigarette smoking is a preventable behavior. Most countries require warnings about health risks on every package, but the effectiveness of these warnings depends upon the ...

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

7 hours ago

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

9 hours ago

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Skepticus
3.5 / 5 (2) Apr 07, 2011
I wouldn't bet on plain packaging to have significant effect in reducing the number of new smokers. Hard drugs and others like estasy and its sibblings has never have flashy packets and pepple still seek them out. And as far as I know, cigarette holders/boxes are not illegal. Expect a flood of flashy designs containers to stuff the ciggies in...
dan42day
5 / 5 (2) Apr 08, 2011
I've thought for years that plainly packaged generic cigarettes would help to take the "cool" factor away, and I still do. I remember how much branding mattered back when I started 40 years ago. Worth a try. I used to also think they should be made available by prescription only, but now realizing what a failure our "war on drugs" has turned into, I'm against that idea.

The difference between cigarettes and other drugs is that cigs don't get you high, other than maybe the 2 or 3 minute rush a first time user gets. The only thing selling them to beginners is the cool factor.