New Chlamydia test shows type of infection

A new Chlamydia test can quickly and easily demonstrate the subtype (serovar) of the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis a person is infected with. This has important clinical implications, because some Chlamydia subtypes, that particularly appear in homosexual men, need longer treatment with antibiotics. So far, it was not possible to demonstrate with one test only which subtype of Chlamydia trachomatis a person is infected with. Moreover, the new testing method is less time consuming than before. Koen Quint studied the new test in his PhD research project. The newly developed test is now commercially available. If there is no need to test the subtype, the test may also be used only to show whether someone is infected with Chlamydia. Koen Quint will defend his PhD thesis on Thursday, May 26 at VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

There are nineteen subtypes of . The classification is based on the proteins that are present on the outer surface of the Chlamydia bacteria. The genetic code in the DNA of the bacteria determines which proteins those are. The new test shows which DNA the Chlamydia bacteria contain, by which the Chlamydia subtype can be ascertained. The test also shows if someone is infected with more than one subtype. With the test result it can then be decided what antibiotic treatment option is most suitable.

Koen Quint found no evidence that Chlamydia infections are associated with the development of . Until now there were indications that Chlamydia can stimulate the development of cervical cancer in women that are infected with the (HPV). Koen Quint did not find evidence for such association in HPV-infected women. The association found earlier is probably due to the fact that Chlamydia and HPV are transmitted in the same way. Therefore, people are often simultaneously infected with both Chlamydia and HPV. 

Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) and may result in infertility. In the Netherlands, sixty thousand people every year are infected with trachomatis. Most infected people have no symptoms, but they can – unknowingly – infect other people.

Provided by University of Amsterdam

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mice help researchers understand chlamydia

Oct 29, 2007

Genetically engineered mice may hold the key to helping scientists from Queensland University of Technology and Harvard hasten the development of a vaccine to protect adolescent girls against the most common sexually transmitted ...

Scientists Discover Plants Lend Clues to Chlamydia Cure

Nov 10, 2006

Researchers from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) have discovered that Chlamydia, a bacterium that causes a sexually transmitted disease (STD), shares an evolutionary heritage with plants. That ...

Possible Chlamydia vaccine target found

Sep 12, 2007

U.S. scientists have identified a potential target for a vaccine to fight Chlamydia -- the world's most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial infection.

Recommended for you

Recorded Ebola deaths top 7,000

6 hours ago

The worst Ebola outbreak on record has now killed more than 7,000 people, with many of the latest deaths reported in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization said as United Nations Secretary-General Ban ...

Liberia holds Senate vote amid Ebola fears (Update)

11 hours ago

Health workers manned polling stations across Liberia on Saturday as voters cast their ballots in a twice-delayed Senate election that has been criticized for its potential to spread the deadly Ebola disease.

Evidence-based recs issued for systemic care in psoriasis

Dec 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—For appropriately selected patients with psoriasis, combining biologics with other systemic treatments, including phototherapy, oral medications, or other biologic, may result in greater efficacy ...

Bacteria in caramel apples kills at least four in US

Dec 19, 2014

A listeria outbreak believed to originate from commercially packaged caramel apples has killed at least four people in the United States and sickened 28 people since November, officials said Friday.

Steroid-based treatment may answer needs of pediatric EoE patients

Dec 19, 2014

A new formulation of oral budesonide suspension, a steroid-based treatment, is safe and effective in treating pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.