The connection between economic distress, suicide

May 18, 2011

If the United States follows the pattern that occurred after the economic crisis in Japan, public health officials should watch for a significant increase in suicides, particularly in the baby boom population, concluded a study scheduled for presentation at the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting

The research was scheduled for presentation Sunday, May 15, at the 164 the Annual Meeting, which is in Honolulu May 14-18.

Researchers looked at in Japan in the late 1990s when that country experienced an similar to recent trends in the United States and Europe. The study looked at suicides in Japan by age, gender and year in relation to a series of economic variables.

If the U.S. rates of increased suicide approximate those in Japan, the country would experience a yearly increase of deaths due to suicide estimated at 14,610 per year, the study concluded.

Details of this study, along with five other new research studies, will be presented at a media briefing from the APA Annual Meeting. Members of the media can attend in Room 307 of the Hawaii Convention Center at 8 am Hawaii time, Monday, May 16, or participate online at 11 AM PDT/2 pm EDT by registering at www2.gotomeeting.com/register/341505819.

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