Low-dose chest CT effective in reducing radiation for evaluation of cardiothoracic surgery patients

May 4, 2011

Recent studies have shown that a 64-detector CT angiography utilizing prospective electrocardiographic (ECG) gating produces a quality image but considerably reduced patient radiation dose when compared to retrospective ECG gating, according to research being presented at the 2011 American Roentgen Ray Society's annual meeting.

The study was conducted in the Department of Radiology at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center, in Cleveland, OH. Researchers evaluated 29 patients who underwent prospectively-gated 100 kV whole chest CT for preoperative cardiothoracic surgery. The mean was determined and compared to a group of regular dose prospectively-gated exams. "The most significant aspect of our study was to demonstrate that pre-operative evaluation of cardiothoracic surgery patients can be reliably and accurately performed with low-dose chest CT that results in a radiation dose reduction of 42% when compared with traditional dose chest CT exams. In an era of heightened awareness of to patients from , this is a significant finding," said Sonali Mehandru, MD, one of the authors of the study.

"In particular, our study showed that low-dose chest CT can provide accurate assessment of the coronary arteries in a sizable percentage of patients. The coronary arteries are particularly important to evaluate prior to cardiothoracic surgery because the presence of impacts a patient's risk for perioperative morbidity and mortality," said Dr. Mehandru.

"Traditionally, this evaluation has been performed with cardiac catheterization -- an invasive and expensive procedure. In our study, we found that a large cohort of patients (23 of 38 patients) had accurate enough noninvasive assessment of the coronary arteries on low-dose chest CT that they did not require further evaluation with cardiac catheterization," she said.

"This is a preliminary study and further research with larger cohorts of patients is needed. However, it is a good starting point in demonstrating that radiation dose from chest CT's can be significantly reduced without compromising accuracy or reliability of anatomic evaluation. In preoperative patients who are especially prone to undergoing repeated imaging studies, this radiation dose reduction can be very significant," said Dr. Mehandru.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Cell phones and rats: Study explores radiation exposure

May 28, 2016

For some years research teams have explored and attempted to sort out any evidence concerning a cause-effect situation with mobile phones and cancer. Interest in the question does not disappear. Scientific groups prefer to ...

Scientists block breast cancer cells from hiding in bones

May 25, 2016

Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise ...

Genetic sequencing reveals drug resistance growth

May 25, 2016

The rate at which genetically mutated cancer cells grow may help explain why patients with a common form of leukemia develop treatment resistance, according to new research led by a Weill Cornell Medicine investigator. The ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.