Effects of Asperger's syndrome noticeable in babies

People with Asperger syndrome have problems with social interaction and attentiveness, and are also sensitive to noise and light. Several of these characteristics were evident to parents during their child's first two years, reveals Petra Dewrang's thesis in psychology at the University of Gothenburg.

In her thesis, Dewrang investigated how individuals with Asperger syndrome aged 14-24 perceive themselves relative to their diagnosis. The thesis is based on interviews, tests and self-evaluations. A questionnaire for parents also resulted in important descriptions of these individuals' behaviour and development from onwards.

The results show first and foremost that the similarities are greater than the differences when the Asperger group and the comparison group describe their lives.

"But the differences that do exist are vital for understanding how people with Asperger syndrome stand the best chance of getting by," says Dewrang.

The Asperger group were as content with themselves and their lives as the comparison group.

But they found it harder to build relationships with other people, and their plans for the future were less "adventurous". Parents and siblings were more present in their lives than is normal for this age group, even after they had left home. On the other hand, they were just as good at as the comparison group when they had to explain why the key person in a story reacted in a certain way. However, the ability to theoretically understand other peoples' thoughts and feelings are not always enough for making friends in real life.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What women think during their first pregnancy

Feb 26, 2008

Pregnant women who perceive having had a well-balanced relationship with their parents during their childhood will experience fewer difficulties in the transition to motherhood, as opposed to women whose relationship with ...

Casting light on social blame

Oct 06, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Mothers whose children suffer from emotional and behavioral disabilities say they shoulder a tremendous social burden of responsibility to remedy their kids’ problems, says Linda Blum, associate ...

Recommended for you

Discovery hints at why stress is more devastating for some

1 hour ago

Some people take stress in stride; others are done in by it. New research at Rockefeller University has identified the molecular mechanisms of this so-called stress gap in mice with very similar genetic backgrounds—a ...

Family dinners reduce effects of cyberbullying in adolescents

13 hours ago

Sharing regular family meals with children may help protect them from the effects of cyberbullying, according to a study by McGill professor Frank Elgar, Institute for Health and Social Policy. Because family meal times represent ...

The Edwardians were also fans of brain training

19 hours ago

Brain-training programmes are all the rage. They are part of a growing digital brain-health industry that earned more than US$1 billion in revenue in 2012 and is estimated to reach US$6 billion by 2020. The extent to which they actually improve brain function re ...

Report advocates improved police training

Aug 29, 2014

A new report released yesterday by the Mental Health Commission of Canada identifies ways to improve the mental health training and education that police personnel receive.

User comments