ALK rearrangement found in nearly 10 percent of patients in Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium

July 5, 2011

ALK rearrangement has been found in 9.6% of lung cancer patients tested in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium, and MET amplification in another 4.1%, reflecting how many patients might benefit from targeted therapies such as crizotinib, according to research presented at the 14th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Amsterdam, hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC), involving 14 U.S. cancer centers, was established to evaluate in 1,000 patients with advanced .

CLIA-certified labs at each site are using multiplex assays to profile eight genes previously linked to lung cancer, AKT1, BRAF, EGFR, , KRAS, MEK1, NRAS and PIK3CA. Two other genes, ALK and MET, have been tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rearrangements or amplifications.

"High quality molecular diagnosis for multiple markers can be achieved in a reasonable period of time to select patients for targeted therapy," said Prof. Marileila Varella Garcia, Ph.D., a professor of at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Put simply, ALK rearrangement occurs when the head (promoter) and tail (active domain) of the gene split. Either part may then fuse with another gene. When the active domain of ALK fuses with a hyperactive promoter such as the EML4 promoter, it creates a fusion oncogene that has been associated with non-small cell lung cancer.

patients with ALK rearrangement have been found in previous studies to respond well to crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor.

In the LCMC study, researchers looked for ALK fusion with EML4 (EML4-ALK) or other partners, and MET amplification. ALK rearrangement was detected in 9.6% of patients and MET amplification in 4.1%.

ALK mutations were associated with younger age, median 52.3 years; ALK negative subjects had a median age of just under 60 years. ALK positive subjects were more likely to be never-smokers than ALK negative subjects (64% vs. 31%), less likely to have smoked in the past (33% vs. 61%) and more likely to have experienced liver metastasis (21% vs. 8%). No association was found between ALK-positive status and sex, gender, stage or brain metastasis.

Explore further: Benefit of targeted lung cancer therapy confirmed

Related Stories

Benefit of targeted lung cancer therapy confirmed

June 3, 2011

A drug that targets a specific type of lung cancer shows a dramatic response in more than half of the people who take it. The drug, called crizotinib, has been in clinical trials since 2006, and the results from the largest ...

Recommended for you

Cancer's big data problem

October 20, 2016

Data is pouring into the hands of cancer researchers, thanks to improvements in imaging, models and understanding of genetics. Today the data from a single patient's tumor in a clinical trial can add up to one terabyte—the ...

Gene fusions can lead to glioblastoma in children

October 20, 2016

Every year, about 60 children and adolescents in Germany are diagnosed with glioblastoma, a very aggressive type of brain cancer, which is still mostly untreatable. Now, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular ...

Does a cancer cell's shape hint at its danger?

October 19, 2016

Doctors can sometimes use a cancer cell's genetics to predict how it will act - how dangerous it is and thus what treatments should be used against it. Now a paper published in the journal Integrative Biology shows that a ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.