CDC: Doctors prescribing fewer antibiotics to kids

By MIKE STOBBE , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- The push to get pediatricians to stop prescribing antibiotics for the wrong illnesses is paying off a bit, a new government report found.

Since the early 1990s, there's been a 10 percent drop in prescription rates for antibiotics for kids 14 and younger, the reported Thursday.

Antibiotics are often used - but don't work - against viral illnesses like colds and flu. Antibiotics fight infections caused by bacteria. Misuse can lead to .

Experts say inappropriately prescribe antibiotics more than 50 percent of the time, and more often with respiratory infections.

The CDC found larger declines - about 25 percent - in how often doctors used antibiotics against , colds and some other upper respiratory infections. But there was no significant change in how often they prescribed the drugs for , bronchitis and sinusitis.

The new findings represent progress, but also suggest that doctors are still prescribing antibiotics too often, said Dr. Lauri Hicks, a CDC epidemiologist who worked on the study.

"The bad news is we still have a long way to go," she said.

The CDC study was the government's first look at the issue in about a decade. It was based on an annual survey of doctors' offices, and compared rates from 1993-1994 to 2007-2008.

The improvement could be partly driven by that help doctors pinpoint whether a sore throat is caused by a virus or , CDC researchers said. The study also found fewer parents took their kids to doctors for upper respiratory infections, which could be thanks to a vaccine against pneumococcal bacteria that became available in 2000.

A public health campaign about antibiotics may have also had some impact, CDC officials said.

Doctors have not always followed recommendations to cut back on antibiotics, partly because of pressure from parents, said Dr. Kenneth Bromberg, chairman of pediatrics at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York.

Moms and dads who have been up with sick, screaming infants in the middle of the night tend to expect more from a doctor than advice to keep an eye on the problem. Often, they want , and may not stop at one doctor to get them, he said.

"In this new age of consumerism, they will go somewhere else and get what they want," Bromberg said.

The taxing nature of ear infections may be why the CDC didn't find a decrease in the antibiotic prescribing rate for that problem, he added.

More information: CDC report: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Antibiotics found to increasingly fail

Apr 09, 2007

Pediatricians in the United States are increasingly finding that antibiotics are not always ideal for treating ear infections, a report says.

Brits battle antibiotic overuse

Jan 09, 2008

Britain's health secretary announced a $5.2 million campaign against "superbugs" that asked doctors to lay off antibiotics for viral colds, coughs and flus.

Recommended for you

Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines

17 hours ago

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive ...

Drug watchdog urges vigilance in cancer drug theft

21 hours ago

Europe's medicine watchdog urged doctors Thursday to be vigilant in administering the cancer drug Herceptin, vials of which had been stolen in Italy and tampered with before being sold back into the supply chain.

Pyridoxine-doxylamine drug safety data lacking

Apr 16, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—The most commonly prescribed drug for pregnant women suffering from morning sickness in their first trimester does not prevent birth defects even though drug safety data says it does, according to research ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Migel
not rated yet Sep 12, 2011
Once I have asked our pediatrician, why are antibiotics so frequently prescribed if most colds are viral. The answer was that when viral infection begins, often bacterial infection can follow soon.

Also, tetracyclines and macrolides have proven anti-inflammatory effects, which can have some beneficial effect in case of viral infection.