Man held in Britain over contamination of painkillers

British police arrested a man on Friday after anti-psychotic and epilepsy drugs were placed in packets of the painkiller Nurofen Plus, Scotland Yard said.

The case of suspected sabotage last month led to the makers of Nurofen Plus, Reckitt Benckiser, recalling the in Britain and halting their distribution.

A spokesman for London's Metropolitan Police Service said the unnamed 30-year-old man had been arrested in Bromley in the south of the capital on "suspicion of contamination of goods".

"The man is currently being held for questioning at a south London police station," the spokesman told AFP.

Five contaminated packets of Nurofen Plus were found in Britain in August, prompting a national and the recall by the manufacturers.

Four of the affected packs contained XL, an anti-psychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia, mania and bipolar depression, and two people accidentally took the drug but suffered no harm.

The epilepsy drug Neurontin was found in another packet but no one was thought to have taken it.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Dutch police investigate apparent hacker attack

Dec 10, 2010

(AP) -- Police said Friday they are investigating if hackers were responsible for taking down websites of police and prosecutors in the Netherlands after the arrest of a 16-year-old for involvement in a cyberattack on several ...

British teen arrested over CIA, US Senate hacking

Jun 21, 2011

British police working with the FBI arrested a 19-year-old man over attacks by a hacker group on businesses and government agencies including the CIA, US Senate and Sony, Scotland Yard said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Have a cold? Don't ask your doctor for antibiotics

Nov 26, 2014

Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health. Resistance makes it harder for physicians to treat infections and can increase the chance patients will die from an infection. What is more, the treatment ...

Powdered measles vaccine found safe in early clinical trials

Nov 25, 2014

A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published November 28 in the journal ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.