NJ doctor loses license after hepatitis B outbreak

(AP) -- New Jersey officials have revoked the medical license of an oncologist they say committed "gross and repeated acts of negligence" that led to an outbreak of hepatitis B among his patients.

The Star-Ledger newspaper reports that the state Board of Medical Examiners on Wednesday revoked Parvez Dara's license for four years and charged him $30,000 in civil penalties. His license already had been suspended for 2 1/2 years, meaning he can reapply in 18 months.

Prosecutors said conditions at Dara's office were rife for spreading infections. They say at least 29 of his patients have been infected with , a virus that affects the liver.

Dara's lawyer, Peter Korn, said evidence that the cases of were linked was based on "flawed medical science."

The state had warned more than 5,000 patients at Dara's Toms River office to get tested.

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