Increased resistance training does not benefit cardiac rehabilitation patients: study

For patients undergoing rehabilitation following cardiac events, aerobic exercise training (AT) is widely recommended. Resistance training (RT) has also been shown to be beneficial because it enhances muscular strength and endurance, functional capacity and independence, and quality of life, while reducing disability. In a study scheduled for publication in the October issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, researchers compared two RT regimens of different intensity in combination with AT. They determined that higher volume of RT in combination with AT does not yield any additional benefits.

"Our data demonstrate that for cardiac patients, women and men engaged in combined AT and RT, a twice-per-week 3 set x 15 reps volume of performed on 10 different lifts resulted in no training advantage over 2 set x 12 reps," commented Serge P. von Duvillard, PhD, FACSM, FECSS, Director, Applied Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology-Exercise Science and Biology, The College of Idaho. "Furthermore, combining resistance protocol with more traditional AT in cardiac rehabilitation programs resulted in substantial physical fitness benefits, as well as reductions in cardiovascular risk markers. In the interest of supervision time, exercise duration, and equipment usage, applying the 2 set x 12 reps model of resistance exercise appears effective and efficient."

Investigators compared the effectiveness of RT combined with aerobic training in a residential cardiac rehabilitation setting. 295 patients were randomly divided into 2 groups that performed two levels of RT. Each RT session consisted of 10 different resistance exercises and the 2 groups performed either 2 sets of 12 repetitions or 3 sets of 15 repetitions, twice per week. Patients at the higher repetition level were performing about twice the exercise of the other group. Patients all completed moderate AT composed of cycling 6 times per week and walking 5 times per week during the 26-day rehabilitation.

Both groups showed equivalent improvement in exercise capacity, muscular strength, hemodynamics and blood chemistries regardless of RT volume. Blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk indicators were generally improved. Maximal oxygen uptake increased by 11%. There were modest but significant reductions in resting heart rate and resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Collectively, these results point to a reduction in overall cardiac risk, along with improvement in physiologic performance variables that should result in an improvement in quality of life. Patients enrolled in the study did not exhibit adverse effects like increased blood pressure or heart rate or as the result of RT.

More information: The article is "Resistance Training Dose Response in Combined Endurance-Resistance Training in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: A Randomized Trial" by Robert Berent, MD, Serge P. von Duvillard, PhD, Stephen F. Crouse, PhD, Helmut Sinzinger, MD, John S. Green, PhD, and Peter Schmid, MD. It will appear in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Volume 92, Issue 10 (October 2011) doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.04.021

Provided by Elsevier Health Sciences

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study compares exercise regimens for obese older adults

Jan 26, 2009

Sedentary, obese older adults appear to improve their functional abilities and reduce insulin resistance through a combination of resistance and aerobic exercises, according to a report in the January 26 issue of Archives of ...

People with type 2 diabetes improved muscular strength

Sep 22, 2009

Physical therapist-directed exercise counseling combined with fitness center-based exercise training can improve muscular strength and exercise capacity in people with type 2 diabetes, with outcomes similar to those of supervised ...

Recommended for you

Improving clinical pain management practices

7 minutes ago

Oncologists treat cancer, neurologists specialise in brain disorders, immunologists diagnose infectious diseases, and a host of other specialists tackle ailments from broken bones to ruptured arteries. But ...

Train your brain to prefer healthy foods

10 minutes ago

"I can resist anything except temptation." Anyone who has ever been on a diet can relate to that quip from Oscar Wilde. No matter what the fad diet du jour says, the only way to lose weight is to reduce the net number of ...

Colorado proposes edible pot ban, then retreats

2 hours ago

Colorado health authorities suggested banning many edible forms of marijuana, including brownies, cookies and most candies. Then the officials quickly backtracked after the suggestion went public.

User comments