29th person dies in cantaloupe listeria outbreak

November 3, 2011

The death toll in an outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe has reached 29 after federal health authorities say an eighth person has died in Colorado.

The said Wednesday that 139 persons have been sickened or killed in 28 states.

The tainted Colorado cantaloupes have been off store shelves for weeks now. But the symptoms of listeria can take up to two months to appear.

Deaths also have been reported in Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Texas and Wyoming.

Jensen Farms in Holly, Colo., recalled the cantaloupes Sept. 14.

Explore further: FDA, CDC investigate listeriosis outbreak's source


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not rated yet Nov 04, 2011
The FDA really dropped the ball on this one.
Now before everyone gets offended and furtively asks how I could ever want to live in a world without the FDA (I don't) consider a few things first. The fact of the matter is 29 people are dead. The fact of the matter is the FDA knew about the listeria for 48 days without enforcing a recall. The fact of the matter is the FDA has allowances for many of the known causes of listeria in your food, including fecal matter. Check it out: http://eng.am/qbfYkY
The biggest defense the FDA has is their "lack of resources." Well the FDA is trying to regulate food, pharmaceuticals, medical apps for smartphones and tablets etc, salt, movie theatre popcorn, tobacco, energy drinks, dietary supplements and more each day. It seems the FDA won't be satisfied until they've regulated everything to death.
If you claim the FDA doesn't have the resources, they are currently launching a new 600$ anti-smoking campaign. I bet that could hire a few more investigator

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