Laser treatment can make your brown eyes blue

by Deborah Braconnier report

Just like the old Crystal Gayle song, a new laser technology could soon allow you to turn those boring brown eyes of your to a rich and beautiful blue. But you better make sure that blue eyes are what you really want because there is no reversing this surgery.

Dr. Gregg Homer from Medical in Laguna Brach, California has developed a new treatment known as Lumineyes. Homer has been working on the treatment for the last 10 years and submitted a patent for the idea in 2005.

People with brown eyes have a known as melanin in the front of their irises. People with blue eyes, or the recessive traits, have this brown melanin but only in the back of the . It is this lack of pigment that creates the blue color.

In Dr. Homer’s procedure, which only takes about 20 seconds, a laser is used to remove the from the top layer of the iris. Within a few weeks, the blue eye color emerges.

But don’t start making phone calls and getting in line to have your eye color changed just yet. This procedure has only had limited testing on humans and the company is currently seeking funding to complete human trials. It is the hope of Dr. Homer that the procedure will be available outside the U.S. within the next 18 months and U.S. residents could see it becoming available within the next three years.

With so many people turning to cosmetic contact lenses to change the color of their eyes, this new procedure would offer a permanent alternative. Dark eyes are much more common than blue eyes, with about 80 percent of the population having the darker pigment. Stroma Medical has conducted two different surveys that show 17 percent of these dark-eyed people would choose the permanent color change if it was safe and effective.

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KBK
5 / 5 (7) Nov 04, 2011
Lets all rush out and do something stupidly emotional and senseless... with one of the basic and important human senses...when we have no idea what the hell the long term or subtle/final results may be.

Sounds good! Who's with me?

Lemming time! (can't touch this!)
krundoloss
5 / 5 (8) Nov 04, 2011
This reminds me of a Dr. Seuss book my mom used to read me. All the Who's in Whoville looked the same, then one day a Who got a star put on its belly. Everyone wanted to be unique, so everyone got a star on their belly. Soon enough, the Who's without a star were the unique ones, then everyone lined up to have thier star removed. Point being - we all want to be unique, but you already are. If everyone had blue eyes then the brown ones would be desired. Embrace who you are!
antialias_physorg
2.6 / 5 (5) Nov 04, 2011
Lets all rush out and do something stupidly emotional and senseless...

...

when we have no idea what the hell the long term or subtle/final results may be.

Sounds good! Who's with me?

If tattoos are anything to go by: most everybody.

If everyone had blue eyes then the brown ones would be desired. Embrace who you are!

Soooo...if everyone was fit and trim suddenly the fat people would be in great demand? Unlikely.
sdf_iain
4.2 / 5 (5) Nov 04, 2011
Soooo...if everyone was fit and trim suddenly the fat people would be in great demand? Unlikely.


Check out some renaissance art... fat used to be in, it can make a comeback!
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Nov 04, 2011
It was 'in' because it was a sign that you could actually afford to eat a lot (where hunger or scarcity was the norm in those days). being fat wasn't the draw but the wealth it implied (and still implies in some countries).

If we ever get to near universal starvation in the developed countries then being fat may make a comeback. But before then? I doubt it.
krundoloss
4 / 5 (4) Nov 04, 2011
nitpick away! Cant anyone put an entry without somebody putting a dum smartypants comment about it. My point was clear.
douglas2
5 / 5 (3) Nov 04, 2011
krundoloss : This reminds me of a Dr. Seuss book my mom used to read me. All the Who's in Whoville looked the same....


I believe they were Sneetches.
kaasinees
1 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2011
Does anyone know how its possible that your color of your eyes can change between blue/green/grey depending on the lighting?
jscroft
1 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2011
I have to think that melanin is there for a reason... maybe to protect the retina from burns due to glare? This treatment effectively gives you the eyes (and probably the eye problems) of an albino. Seems like a terribly bad idea to me.
Callippo
not rated yet Nov 04, 2011
NickFun
not rated yet Nov 04, 2011
Hey, it's no worse than getting a tattoo. I have had the permanent image of The Road Runner emblazoned on my ass for 32 years.
Silverhill
not rated yet Nov 04, 2011
krundoloss: This reminds me of a Dr. Seuss book my mom used to read me. All the Who's in Whoville looked the same....
I believe they were Sneetches.
Indeed they were. One tribe of them were born with stars, the other without. The "star-bellied Sneetches" thought themselves superior because of, essentially, the color of their skin....
barakn
not rated yet Nov 05, 2011
And then of course there was Sylvester McMonkey McBean, who recognized a good opportunity when he saw one, and fleeced both tribes. Dr. Gregg Homer from Stroma Medical in Laguna Brach, California, plays McBean in this story, although he has yet to invent a star-on machine.
stardust magician
5 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2011
We are all unique, just like everyone else.
Ricochet
not rated yet Nov 05, 2011
I'm shocked that this article was posted here AFTER it was on mainstream media news. What gives? We're supposed to be kept ahead of the curve by perusing these websites on a regular basis!
knikiy
not rated yet Nov 05, 2011
I'm shocked that this article was posted here AFTER it was on mainstream media news. What gives? We're supposed to be kept ahead of the curve by perusing these websites on a regular basis!

Maybe this was too earth shattering to withheld from the world at large?
dav_i
not rated yet Nov 06, 2011
Does anyone know how its possible that your color of your eyes can change between blue/green/grey depending on the lighting?

Nope, but I have this with my eyes too. Probably the pigment just happens to reflect some wavelengths which are common in different types of lighting better than others.
SheldonsSister
5 / 5 (1) Nov 07, 2011
'Boring brown eyes', 'rich and beautiful blue', but the scariest..'treatment'!? I had no idea, brown eyes were an illness..
Stepford Wives, here we come!!
Ricochet
not rated yet Nov 08, 2011
Mine are hazel, in the fact that they do boast a somewhat prismatic effect when lights of varying frequencies hit them. It's probably just a trick with the different muscles being different colors, hence the effect of seeing a random array of colors across them when you look close enough.
Ironically, they have to use a prismatic effect in my eyeglasses to correct for my astigmatism. Coincidence?
Alright, no, not at all... but interesting.
Ricochet
not rated yet Nov 08, 2011
I was thinking... I wonder if they could do designer effects... like half-brown half-blue, or stripes... maybe a swirly pattern...
Tausch
not rated yet Nov 28, 2011
...maybe a swirly pattern...or as numbers to verify or forge identities...