Majority of B.C. women take prescription drugs during pregnancy: study

Almost two-thirds of women in British Columbia filled at least one prescription at some point in their pregnancy, including drugs with potential risks, according to a new study by University of British Columbia researchers.

The study, published today in the journal Clinical Therapeutics, is the first of its kind in . Researchers analyzed population-based outpatient prescription claims data for patterns of prescription during in B.C. from 2001 to 2006.

The researchers found that 63.5 per cent of in B.C. filled at least one prescription. One in thirteen – or 7.8 per cent – filled a prescription for a medicine known to be risky in pregnancy – most often for select medicines for anxiety, insomnia and depression. Drugs that are strictly contraindicated pregnancy, however, were filled in less than 0.5% of pregnancies.

"Although much remains to be understood about the appropriateness of medicine use that actually occurs among pregnant women in B.C., one encouraging finding from our study is that existing use of medicines with known risks declines dramatically when women become pregnant," says co-author Steve Morgan, an associate professor in the School of Population and Public Health (SPPH) and Associate Director of the Centre for Health Services and Policy Research (CHSPR).

On average, pregnant women filled 2.6 different types of drugs, while 15 per cent used five or more prescription medications during their pregnancy. Prescriptions most frequently filled during pregnancy were for antibiotics (30.5 per cent), respiratory drugs (25.7 per cent), dermatologics (13.4 per cent), and drugs that act on the nervous system (12.8 per cent).

Other study findings include:

  • The use of medicines in pregnancy slightly increased over time, going from 63 per cent of women in 2001 to 66 per cent in 2006.
  • Women aged 20 years or younger were most likely to take during pregnancy (69 per cent) while the lowest rate occurred among those aged 30 to 35 years (62 per cent).
  • Prescription medication use was also high in the first three months immediately following delivery, a period when women may be breastfeeding, with 61.3 per cent of women filling .
"Since pregnant women are normally excluded from clinical trials of new drugs and post-market study is limited, there is little evidence on the risks and benefits of many of the most commonly used drugs in pregnancy," says lead author Jamie Daw, a researcher at CHSPR, part of SPPH. "Given the prevalence of prescription use, more research is needed to help pregnant women and their physicians make informed decisions."

More information: www.clinicaltherapeutics.com

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Widespread use of medications among pregnant women reported

Apr 25, 2011

Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Harvard School of Public Health, have reported widespread and increasing medication ...

Some prescription meds can harm fetus

Nov 17, 2009

More than six percent of expectant mothers in Quebec consume prescription drugs that are known to be harmful to their fetuses, according to a Université de Montréal investigation published in the British Jo ...

Recommended for you

Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

15 hours ago

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), introduced in 2007, is a model of health care that emphasizes personal relationships, team delivery of care, coordination across specialties and care settings, quality ...

New mums still excessively sleepy after four months

16 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth.

It's time to address the health of men around the world

16 hours ago

All over the world, men die younger than women and do worse on a host of health indicators, yet policy makers rarely focus on this "men's health gap" or adopt programs aimed at addressing it, according to an international ...

User comments