Novel mechanism regulating stress identified

Neuroscience researchers from Tufts have demonstrated, for the first time, that the physiological response to stress depends on neurosteroids acting on specific receptors in the brain, and they have been able to block that response in mice. This breakthrough suggests that these critical receptors may be drug therapy targets for control of the stress-response pathway. This finding may pave the way for new approaches to manage a wide range of neurological disorders involving stress.

The stress-control pathway, more technically known as the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis, determines the levels of cortisol and other in the human body. In addition to being implicated in the types of emotional and that can lead to , disorders of the stress-control pathway are also associated with obesity, premenstrual syndrome, postpartum depression, Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) and diseases including epilepsy and osteoporosis.

"We have identified a novel mechanism regulating the body's response to stress by determining that neurosteroids are required to mount the to stress. Moreover, we were able to completely block the physiological response to stress as well as prevent stress-induced anxiety," said author Jamie Maguire, PhD, assistant professor in the department of neuroscience at Tufts University School of Medicine and a member of the Neuroscience and Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics program faculties at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts.

Using the brain tissues of adult mice, the research team identified mechanisms controlling the activity of Corticotrophin Releasing Hormone (CRH) neurons involved in the control of the stress pathway. By monitoring the activity of CRH neurons following stress and measuring levels of corticosterone in the blood, they found that the production of stress hormones required the action of neurosteroids on specific receptors on CRH neurons.

Apart from the finding that stress causes a neurosteroid-induced increase in blood corticosterone levels, the researchers also found that blocking the synthesis of neurosteroids is sufficient to block the stress-induced elevations in corticosterone and prevent stress-induced, anxiety-like behavior in mice. Previous research had identified the presence of specialized CRH-nerve-cell receptors in the HPA axis, but the findings had been controversial because of limited studies showing any connection between these receptors and the regulation of the CRH nerve cells.

"We have found a definite role of neurosteroids on the receptors regulating CRH nerve cells and the . The data suggest that these receptors may be novel targets for control of the stress-control pathway. Our next work will focus on modulating these to treat disorders associated with stress, including and depression-like behaviors," said Maguire.

The first author on the study is Jhimly Sarkar, PhD, formerly a postdoctoral associate in the neuroscience department at TUSM. Additional authors are Seth Wakefield, BS, a neuroscience graduate student at the Sackler School; Georgina MacKenzie, PhD, a postdoctoral associate in neuroscience at TUSM; and Stephen Moss, PhD, professor of neuroscience at TUSM and a member of the neuroscience program faculty at the Sackler School.

More information: Sarkar J, Wakefield S, MacKenzie G, Moss SJ, Maguire J. The Journal of Neuroscience. "Neurosteroidogenesis is required for the physiological response to stress: role of neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors." Published December 14, 2011, doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2560-11.2011

Related Stories

Control of fear in the brain decoded

Sep 06, 2011

When healthy people are faced with threatening situations, they react with a suitable behavioural response and do not descend into a state of either panic or indifference, as is the case, for example, with ...

Recommended for you

New test to help brain injury victims recover

23 hours ago

A dynamic new assessment for helping victims of trauma to the brain, including those suffering from progressive conditions such as dementia, has been developed by a clinical neuropsychologist at the University ...

See-through sensors open new window into the brain

Oct 21, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers' efforts to understand ...

User comments