Men have a stronger reaction to seeing other men's emotions compared with women's

By Bridget Dempsey

(Medical Xpress) -- Men have a stronger response to seeing other men show emotion than when women show emotion, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London.

The study, published in the December issue of the journal Emotion, explored and women’s responses to pictures of people expressing their emotions to work out what side of their brains elicited a response.

Lead author on the study, Dr. Qazi Rahman, from Queen Mary’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, said they found that men, in particular, use the right side of their brains to recognise emotion in other male faces.

He said: “When men were showed expressions of happiness, sadness and anger in other men, they responded with the right side of the brain whereas they used both sides of their brains more or less equally when looking at emotions in women's faces.”

The scientists showed almost 100 volunteers a range of different pictures of facial expressions, each had half a neutral expression and half an expression.

“There was a very strong response from men when they saw other men expressing their emotion. The strongest response was when men were shown angry and surprised male faces. This could be because men might be more wired to notice expressions indicating vigilance or threat in other men compared with women,” Dr. Rahman said.

Expressions indicating vigilance or threat are known as ‘pop out’ emotions. The scientists anticipated a strong response to these types of emotions so the fact that the men’s response to expressions of surprise was strong, was not unexpected.

Dr. Rahman said: “We were a bit confused when men saw other male’s expressions of disgust, another ‘pop out’ emotion, that it did not elicit a strong response. It may be that disgust is a less important cue for men than surprise and could indicate ‘withdrawal’ which men may ignore.”

The research challenges the idea of simplistic sex differences in the brain, showing they are influenced by features of both the observer and the person being observed (in this case, sex of face and emotion displayed). The findings also challenge two theories explaining how emotions are organised in the brain, as Dr. Rahman explains.

“One theory argues that the right hemisphere of the brain deals with all emotions,” he said. “The other states that positive emotions are processed by the right hemisphere and negative emotions by the left. Our work suggest both theories are over-simplifications because they don’t take ‘the details’ into account, such as of the sex of the person who is showing that emotion.”

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Callippo
2.3 / 5 (6) Dec 07, 2011
Because the womens emotions are unstable and they doesn't matter.
Nerdyguy
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 07, 2011
Because the womens emotions are unstable and they doesn't matter.


???
FrankHerbert
Dec 07, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Callippo
1 / 5 (4) Dec 07, 2011
Callippo, that's not cool.
It may be possible, but is it really wrong? Every married man knows well, for long and happy marriage you should ignore/average the occasional emotional instabilities of partner. Actually, for most women the lack of affective personality traits appears sexy. They're seeking strong non labile men instinctively and they're repelled with overly sensitive homosexuals (..it will be probably the subject of another imbecile psychological research published next month...).

I'm not judging here and saying, how the things should be, but for me the results of the above research are trivial and play well with my own life experience.
Callippo
1 / 5 (4) Dec 07, 2011
Genetically the women are adjusted to the intelligence and emotional lability of their children (who are switching their affections fast because of their fast paced biological clock). It helps them to understand their children better and train them in emotional feeling necessary for complex social life. The mens are selected to keep their minds cool and stable, when the whole rest of tribe is running around and screaming from fear of danger (..downvoted with NerdyGuy symptomatically).
Nerdyguy
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 07, 2011
(..downvoted with NerdyGuy symptomatically).


What?

BTW, I love that I got the robovote on the above comment where I only wrote "???". lmao

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