Making healthy choices easy for shoppers

Making healthy choices easy for shoppers
The Foodswitch app gives shoppers instant nutritional information on food products.

FoodSwitch, an Australian-first iPhone app, has been launched recently to help shoppers make healthier food choices in the supermarket and reduce high levels of fat, salt and sugar from their diets.

By simply scanning the barcode of Australian packaged foods using an camera, shoppers will receive immediate, easy to understand nutritional advice via the FoodSwitch app.

"FoodSwitch's three-step approach marries the latest technology with cutting edge research. Australians can now scan barcodes, see what's in a food, and switch to a in an instant," said Professor Bruce Neal, senior director at The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney.

The app makes recommendations based on the nutritional value of more than 20,000 packaged food products found in Australian supermarkets and is underpinned by more than three years of research by pre-eminent food and health policy experts from The George Institute.

The initiative is part of a new partnership with Bupa, one of Australia's leading healthcare organisations. Together, The George Institute and Bupa are committed to help Australians make healthier .

Heart disease, stroke and other diseases caused mostly by a are the biggest killers in Australia, and by simply switching to a healthier alternative, shoppers could be reducing their risk of these illnesses.

The app will demystify nutritional labels and front of pack health claims, and give shoppers a true report of a product's fat, sugar and salt levels.

"Choosing a healthier diet has to be made easier, because good eating habits are one of the best and most cost-effective ways to prevent disease. For too long, Australians have grappled with confusing . And with FoodSwitch there is no reason why this should continue," Professor Neal said.

More information: www.georgeinstitute.org.au/foodswitch

Related Stories

High salt diets damaging Australian men's sex lives

date Mar 24, 2011

While the adverse affects of high blood pressure on men's sex lives is clear, the direct link between salt and sex is yet to be proven. There is, however, a huge body of evidence showing that salt is the main cause of high ...

Report: Food labels need Energy Star-like ratings

date Oct 20, 2011

Just like that Energy Star tag helps you choose your appliances, a new report says a rating symbol on the front of every soup can, cereal box and yogurt container could help hurried shoppers go home with the healthiest foods.

England says stop supersizing

date Mar 28, 2007

British health regulators are encouraging snack makers to market smaller candy bars and chip packages to help residents slim down.

Recommended for you

Should men cut back on their soy intake?

date 1 hour ago

Recently, a friend called my husband to inquire about the risks for men in consuming too much soy milk. He had read an article that described how one individual's plight led him down the path of breast enlargement, and was ...

Probing Question: What is umami?

date 2 hours ago

The next time you're at a dinner party and want to spice up the conversation, you might compliment the hosts on their umami-rich appetizers. Then wait a moment until someone invariably asks, "What's umami?"

Will the Affordable Care Act eliminate health disparities?

date 3 hours ago

Massachusetts' health reform may be a crystal ball for researchers and policymakers in forecasting the potential impact of the Affordable Care Act. Many see the ACA as the backbone of efforts toward closing the nation's health ...

Experts question election pledges on GP access

date 14 hours ago

As the general election in the UK approaches, experts writing in The BMJ this week question whether the party promises on access to general practice are likely to be achievable.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.