Britain probes sex-selective abortion claims

The British government on Thursday vowed to investigate newspaper reports that doctors illegally approved abortions that were requested due to the sex of the unborn child.

Thursday's Daily Telegraph claimed that it had hidden camera footage which showed doctors at British clinics offering to falsify paperwork in order to allow women to have terminations based on gender.

Andrew Lansley said he was "extremely concerned" by the allegations.

" is illegal and is morally wrong," he said. "I've asked my officials to investigate this as a matter of urgency."

According to the Telegraph, undercover reporters accompanied pregnant woman to nine different clinics across the country.

Doctors at three out of the nine clinics agreed to arrange terminations even though the woman claimed she did not want the baby due to its sex, the paper claimed.

Abortions in Britain are allowed in limited circumstances, including when the pregnancy presents a serious mental or risk to the mother and if there is a high chance the child would have severe disabilities.

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