Classification-based therapy no better for back pain

Classification-Based therapy no better for back pain
Treatment of patients with lower back pain using a classification-based physical therapy approach shows no statistically significant superiority to treatment with usual physical therapy care, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Spine.

(HealthDay) -- Treatment of patients with lower back pain (LBP) using a classification-based physical therapy approach shows no statistically significant superiority to treatment with usual physical therapy care, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Spine.

Adri T. Apeldoorn, of the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, and colleagues compared outcomes of classification-based physical therapy treatment to those of usual physical therapy care for 156 patients with sub-acute or chronic LBP. All participants were classified by research using a modified version of Delitto's classification-based system, and were then randomly allocated to receive Delitto's classification-based treatment approach (74 patients) or usual physical therapy (82 patients). Patients underwent follow-up at eight, 26, and 52 weeks.

The researchers found that there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for outcomes at any time points. After eight weeks, patients in the classification-based group had increased global perceived effect scores (adjusted odds ratio, 1.01; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.31 to 3.28). They also had higher adjusted Oswestry Disability Index scores and (numerical rating scale) scores (0.48 and 0.49 points, respectively). None of the differences were found to be statistically significant.

"The classification-based system as used in this study was not effective for improving physical therapy care outcomes in a population of patients with sub-acute and chronic LBP," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Where Ebola battles are won

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—Four hospitals that are home to advanced biocontainment facilities have become America's ground zero in the treatment of Ebola patients.

Depression tied to worse lumbar spine surgery outcomes

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Depressive symptoms are associated with poorer long-term outcome in patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of The Sp ...

Ebola death toll edging to 4,900 mark: WHO

4 hours ago

The death toll in the world's worst-ever Ebola outbreak has edged closer to 4,900, while almost 10,000 people have now been infected, new figures from the World Health Organization showed Wednesday.

US to track everyone coming from Ebola nations

5 hours ago

U.S. authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the U.S. from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. That includes returning American aid workers, federal health employees ...

User comments