Norovirus sickens George Washington Univ. students

February 16, 2012

(AP) -- Officials at George Washington University in Washington are alerting the campus that about 85 students have been sickened by the norovirus this week.

University officials said in a statement Wednesday that was the cause of dozens of cases of . Officials said students who live at the Foggy Bottom campus, the Mount Vernon campus and off campus were affected but that they could not find a common link.

Students were advised to wash their hands frequently and disinfect surfaces. The school also said it would beef up cleaning of commonly used areas.

Symptoms of norovirus include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. The virus is usually not considered serious and most people recover in one or two days.

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