Government panel favors some WTC cancer claims

February 16, 2012 By DAVID B. CARUSO , Associated Press

(AP) -- A government panel favors expanding an aid program for people sickened by World Trade Center dust to include people who have at least some types of cancer.

Congress has set aside billions of dollars to compensate and treat people suffering from illnesses potentially caused by the clouds of soot and smoke released on 9/11.

But the program doesn't cover cancer, which scientists have yet to conclusively link to trade center toxins.

Members of an meeting in New York agreed Thursday that some should be covered by the program, but they were uncertain whether to extend it to all types of the disease or just some.

The committee's recommendation is due by March 2. Its advice can then either be accepted or rejected by the program's administrator.

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