X-Chromosome gene variant linked to SIDS in boys

February 21, 2012 by HealthDay reporters
X-Chromosome gene variant linked to SIDS in boys
A gene variant on the X-chromosome is associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) only in boys, particularly those who die at the ages of highest SIDS prevalence, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay) -- A gene variant on the X-chromosome is associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) only in boys, particularly those who die at the ages of highest SIDS prevalence, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

Noting that the X-chromosomal A (MAOA) gene is important in both the serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal systems, Michael Klintschar, M.D., from Medical University Hannover, and Christian Heimbold, from Georg August University Göttingen -- both in Germany, examined the frequency of functional polymorphism in the promoter of the MAOA gene in 156 white SIDS cases and 260 gender- and age-matched controls.

The researchers found that the pooled low-expressing alleles *2 and *3 were present in 44.4 percent of male SIDS cases but only 25.5 percent of male control cases. In contrast, there were no differences for females. These alleles were more frequent in infants who died at ages of 46 to 154 days than those who died at an older age (54.9 versus 22.6 percent).

"Our results indicate a relationship between SIDS and the MAOA genotype in boys via influencing serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons in the brainstem," the authors conclude. "This locus is the first X-chromosomal locus associated with SIDS."

Explore further: New study reinforces need for continued infant sleep campaigns to prevent SIDS

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