CYFRA21-1 might be predictive marker in advanced NSCLC

March 15, 2012

Researchers found that CYFRA and change in levels of CYFRA were found to be reliable markers for response to chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a study of 88 patients. Research presented in the April 2012 issue of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer's (IASLC) Journal of Thoracic Oncology shows that this marker can be used to determine whether or not a patient should continue a particular chemotherapy regimen.

As part of a study performed by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B in advanced lung cancer, serum CYFRA levels were measured at baseline and after the first cycle of treatment. According to the study, "higher baseline CYFRA concentrations portend worse overall and failure free survival. Additionally, this trial confirmed the significance of the cut point of a 27 percent reduction in log CYFRA after chemotherapy is of value in determining benefit from treatment."

Researchers warn that further studies are needed, but "if confirmed, this would provide a simple and inexpensive approach to assessment of response to treatment."

The lead author of this work is IALSC member Dr. Martin Edelman. IASLC member co-authors include Dr. Everett Vokes and Dr. Robert Kratzke.

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