Medical School implements successful radiation protection program for undergraduate medical students

A medical school in Ireland has successfully implemented a radiation protection program, improving knowledge of radiation protection among medical undergraduates, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Although the increased use of has resulted in faster, more accurate diagnosis, better assessment of therapy response, and early detection of complications, there has been a great deal of scrutiny of its increasing use. As a result, there is a growing need for medical professionals to be educated in all aspects of diagnostic imaging to ensure a basic understanding of , appropriate and efficient utilization of diagnostic imaging investigations, basic and possible adverse effects of exposure to .

An e-learning module in radiation protection was designed and presented to year four medical undergraduates at University Cork College in Cork, Ireland. All students were required to complete pre-module and post-module .

Eighty-nine percent and 99 percent of the 127 successfully completed and returned the pre-module and post-module questionnaires.

"After the e-learning module, students' post-module radiation protection knowledge had improved significantly," said Sum Leong, MB, lead author of the study.

Analysis of post-module radiation protection knowledge suggested that a favorable self-assessment of knowledge of radiation protection, perception of career prospects in radiology and completion of the e-learning module with an increased number of sessions were factor predictive of improved radiation protection knowledge.

"The undergraduate medical curriculum is undergoing constant review and modification in response to modern medical developments that are changing clinical practice. The introduction of radiation protection into undergraduate curriculum therefore requires careful planning to maximize the effectiveness of the course while avoiding overburdening undergraduates with unmanageable lecture and tutorial schedules," said Leong.

"Combining e-learning and more traditional educational programs such as a clinical radiology rotation is likely to improve student experience," he said.

Provided by American College of Radiology

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Expert panel addresses safety in medical imaging

Dec 02, 2010

An expert panel convened today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) to discuss medical imaging appropriateness, ionizing radiation from imaging procedures and efforts under way to curb ...

Recommended for you

What are the chances that your dad isn't your dad?

4 hours ago

How confident are you that the man you call dad is really your biological father? If you believe some of the most commonly-quoted figures, you could be forgiven for not being very confident at all. But how ...

New technology that is revealing the science of chewing

Apr 15, 2014

CSIRO's 3D mastication modelling, demonstrated for the first time in Melbourne today, is starting to provide researchers with new understanding of how to reduce salt, sugar and fat in food products, as well ...

After skin cancer, removable model replaces real ear

Apr 11, 2014

(HealthDay)—During his 10-year struggle with basal cell carcinoma, Henry Fiorentini emerged minus his right ear, and minus the hearing that goes with it. The good news: Today, the 56-year-old IT programmer ...

Italy scraps ban on donor-assisted reproduction

Apr 09, 2014

Italy's Constitutional Court on Wednesday struck down a Catholic Church-backed ban against assisted reproduction with sperm or egg donors that has forced thousands of sterile couples to seek help abroad.

User comments