Omontys approved for anemic people with kidney disease

March 27, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Omontys (peginesatide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat anemia in adults who require dialysis due to chronic kidney disease.

Anemia is characterized by a lack of enough healthy . The newly approved drug is designed to stimulate bone marrow to produce more of these cells, reducing a person's need for a blood transfusion, the FDA said Tuesday in a news release.

Clinical testing of the once-monthly injection involved 1,608 people with abnormally low hemoglobin, a measure of anemia. The most common side effects were diarrhea, vomiting, high blood pressure and pain in the joints, back, legs or arms, the agency said.

Omontys should not be used in people with who are not on dialysis, nor those with cancer-related anemia, the FDA warned. It should also not be used as a substitute in people who require an immediate to treat anemia.

Omontys is marketed by Palo Alto, Calif.-based Affymax Inc.

Explore further: Fixing common blood disorder would make kidney transplants more successful

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about anemia.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Zika virus infection alters human and viral RNA

October 20, 2016

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that Zika virus infection leads to modifications of both viral and human genetic material. These modifications—chemical tags known as ...

Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn's disease

October 19, 2016

People who retain a particular bacterium in their gut after a bout of food poisoning may be at an increased risk of developing Crohn's disease later in life, according to a new study led by researchers at McMaster University.

Neurodevelopmental model of Zika may provide rapid answers

October 19, 2016

A newly published study from researchers working in collaboration with the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia demonstrates fetal death and brain damage in early chick embryos similar to microcephaly—a ...

Scientists uncover new facets of Zika-related birth defects

October 17, 2016

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.