Varicose veins keep some in long pants all year

March 18, 2012
Varicose veins keep some in long pants all year
An expert discusses risk factors and treatments.

(HealthDay) -- Varicose veins are a cosmetic issue for most people, but they can be a sign of a serious medical problem for others, an expert says.

"Twenty to 25 percent of Americans have varicose veins, and about 6 percent have more advanced venous disease including skin changes or, occasionally, ulcerations," Dr. Peter Gloviczki, a at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a clinic news release.

"Evaluation of varicose veins with ultrasound is an easy and accurate way to assess the need for treatment. New, minimally is available today that is effective and is performed as outpatient treatment," said Gloviczki, who helped develop national guidelines for the treatment of varicose veins for the Society for Vascular Surgery and American Venous Forum.

Varicose veins typically appear in the legs, ankles and feet. People more likely to develop them include , pregnant women, obese people, and those who sit or stand for long periods of time or who have a family history of varicose veins.

In some people, varicose veins can lead to more serious problems such as swollen legs, skin changes, bleeding, blood clots and ulcers, according to Gloviczki.

Exercise, weight loss and elevating the legs can reduce pain and prevent varicose veins from worsening, he said. Compression stockings that squeeze the legs and improve blood flow often are recommended before doctors opt for .

More information: The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about varicose veins.

Related Stories

Protein causes varicose veins

November 4, 2011

Varicose veins, sometimes referred to as "varices" in medical jargon, are usually just a cosmetic problem if they occur as spider veins. In their advanced stage, however, they pose a real health threat. In people with this ...

Recommended for you

Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies

July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. ...

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.