1,000 women a day die in childbirth, says MSF

March 8, 2012

About 1000 women die each day in childbirth or from preventable complications related to pregnancy, humanitarian group Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) said Thursday.

"Worldwide, at any time, 15 percent of pregnancies incur the risk of a potential fatal complication," said Kara Blackburn, responsible for women's health at MSF in a statement to mark International Women's Day.

"Women must have access to quality obstetric care, whether they live in Sydney, Port-au-Prince or Mogadishu," said Blackburn.

She said that access should be the same whether at a modern hospital in a major city, in a conflict zone, a refugee camp or in a shelter after an earthquake.

A report entitled ": a preventable crisis", published in Geneva, shows how MSF emergency obstetric care provided in humanitarian crisis situations can save lives.

The organization believes the solution lies in implementing programmes, especially regarding obstetric complications, the training of specialised personnel and access to appropriate .

MSF provides obstetric care in nearly 30 countries.

Explore further: Pregnant women at low risk of complications can safely be offered a choice of where to give birth

Related Stories

Non-certified providers provide initial care in Bangladesh

January 24, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- In rural Bangladesh, non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants are the first-line providers for women with severe obstetric complications, according to a new study ...

Recommended for you

Sleep loss detrimental to blood vessels

April 22, 2016

Lack of sleep has previously been found to impact the activation of the immune system, inflammation, carbohydrate metabolism and the hormones that regulate appetite. Now University of Helsinki researchers have found that ...

Lowered birth rates one reason why women outlive men

April 18, 2016

Using unique demographic records on 140,600 reproducing individuals from the Utah Population Database, a research team led from Uppsala University has come to the conclusion that lowered birth rates are one reason why women ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.