New clinical practice guidelines on alcoholic liver disease published

EASL today announced the publication of a new clinical practice guideline (CPG) in the area of Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD), bringing the number of CPGs published to date to eight.

ALD, a result of regular and heavy drinking, is the leading cause of liver disease in eastern and western Europe.(1) Europe has the highest alcohol consumption in the world, at 12.18 litres of pure alcohol per person per year.(1) Despite this there has been limited research investment in this area and the development of clinical practice guidelines is therefore both timely and necessary.

The EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines on Alcoholic , build on the issues raised at the Monothematic Conference on , held in Athens in 2010 and have been developed with three main aims. These are to:

  1. Provide physicians with clinical recommendations
  2. Emphasise the fact that alcohol can cause several liver diseases (steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis), all of which may coexist in the same patient
  3. Identify areas of interest for future research, including clinical trials
The guidelines cover the burden of ALD, management of alcohol abuse and dependence, pathogenesis, risk factors for disease progression, diagnosis, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic cirrhosis and . The Clinical Practice Guidelines will be published in August in EASL's Journal of Hepatology.

In addition, EASL has also published a revised CPG on the Management of B. This update incorporates changes to a number of areas including: new indications for and the treatment of HBeAg-negative patients; the recommendation for less frequent HBV DNA testing under ETV or TDF; and the provision of more detailed recommendations for specific sub-groups, particularly HBV and pregnancy and HBV and immunosuppression.

CPGs define the use of diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive modalities, including non-invasive and invasive procedures, in the management of patients with various liver diseases. They are intended to assist physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as patients and interested individuals, in the clinical decision making process by describing a range of generally accepted approaches for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of specific liver diseases.

In addition, a CPG is in development for the Management of Acute Liver Failure. More information on EASL's CPGs can be found on the EASL website at http://www.easl.eu/_.

More information: Handbook for action to reduces alcohol-related harm. World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. 2009. www.euro.who.int/__data/assets… 012/43320/E92820.pdf. Accessed 04.04.12

Provided by European Association for the Study of the Liver

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mayo Clinic seeks new therapies for alcoholic hepatitis

Dec 01, 2008

A new study from Mayo Clinic finds the use of the drug therapy etanercept ineffective in treating alcoholic hepatitis, an acute inflammation of the liver caused by excessive consumption of alcohol. The results of the study ...

Recommended for you

Ebola death toll rises to 5,459: WHO

5 hours ago

The World Health Organization said Friday that 5,459 people had so far died of Ebola out of a total 15,351 cases of infection in eight countries since late December 2013.

Flu season off to a slow start ... for now

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—This year's flu season is off to a slow but detectable start. And it appears to be a typical one that's likely to peak in January or February, a leading U.S. health official says.

Update on new treatments for liver diseases

9 hours ago

Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments. The December issues of AGA's journals—Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastro ...

Amateur photographers aid in remote skin sore trial

10 hours ago

Paediatric infectious disease specialists are bringing novel skin sore research methods to WA in the form of a protocol allowing non-professional photographers to capture high-quality images of skin sores ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.