Six developmental trajectories ID'd in children with autism

April 2, 2012
Six developmental trajectories ID'd in children with autism
Six longitudinal developmental trajectories have been identified among children with autism, with significant heterogeneity seen in developmental pathways within these trajectories, according to a study published online April 2 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay) -- Six longitudinal developmental trajectories have been identified among children with autism, with significant heterogeneity seen in developmental pathways within these trajectories, according to a study published online April 2 in Pediatrics.

Christine Fountain, Ph.D., of Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues described the typical longitudinal developmental trajectories of 6,975 children with autism (aged 2 to 14 years) who were enrolled with the California Department of Developmental Services. Nine items for social, communication, and repetitive behavior functioning were evaluated to construct a score sequence. Using group-based latent trajectory modeling, typical trajectories were identified and the odds of classification within each trajectory were assessed.

The researchers identified six typical patterns of social, communication, and functioning. Significant was seen in developmental pathways within these trajectories, and children whose symptoms were least severe at first diagnosis had a tendency to improve more quickly than those who were more severely affected. One group, representing about 10 percent of children, experienced rapid gains, transitioning from severely affected to high functioning. There was a correlation between and trajectory outcomes; high levels of functioning were more likely among children with non-Hispanic, white, well-educated mothers, and rapid gains were unlikely among with or less-educated mothers.

"It is important to observe the developmental pathways children with autism follow over time to understand the pace and timing of changes," the authors write. "More work is needed to discover whether these longitudinal patterns will help us not only to understand the diversity of autism but also to better target interventions and improve treatment."

Explore further: Largest study to investigate risk factors of autism to begin enrolling families

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Mothers of kids with autism earn less, study shows

March 19, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Mothers of children with autism and autism spectrum disorders earn significantly less than what mothers of children who have no health limitations earn, a new study has found.

Recommended for you

Researchers identify autism genes using new approach

August 1, 2016

Princeton University and Simons Foundation researchers have developed a machine-learning approach that for the first time analyzes the entire human genome to predict which genes may cause autism spectrum disorder, raising ...

New autism genes are revealed in largest-ever study

September 29, 2015

In the largest, most comprehensive genomic analysis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) conducted to date, an international research team led by UC San Francisco scientists has identified 65 genes that play a role in the disorder, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.