Drug approved to treat high blood pressure

(HealthDay) -- The high blood pressure drug Toprol XL has been combined with a low-dose diuretic to form Dutoprol (metoprolol succinate extended release/hyrdrochlorothiazide), which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat high blood pressure.

Toprol XL has been approved in the United States for 20 years as a treatment for hypertension, British drugmaker AstraZeneca said in a news release.

The drug maker said it will charge $18.33 per month when a 90-day supply of the combination drug is ordered with a valid prescription, whether or not the patient has insurance. Retail drug stores also will stock the combination medication.

AstraZeneca said the drug may not be recommended for people with a significantly slow heart rate, uncontrolled heart failure, or allergies to the drug's ingredients.

More information: Medline Plus has more information about Dutoprol's active ingredient.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

FDA approves a new beta blocker

Dec 18, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Bystolic, a beta blocker, for the treatment of high blood pressure. Bystolic (nebivolol) is a new drug not previously approved for use in the United States.

Two pancreatic-enzyme products approved

Mar 02, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Two drugs that supplement the digestion-aiding actions of pancreatic enzymes have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the agency said Thursday in a news release.

FDA approves skin cancer drug

Oct 13, 2006

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug to treat a rare, slow-growing skin cancer.

Recommended for you

WHO: Millions of Ebola vaccine doses ready in 2015

Oct 24, 2014

The World Health Organization says millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines will start being tested in March.

Added benefit of vedolizumab is not proven

Oct 23, 2014

Vedolizumab (trade name Entyvio) has been approved since May 2014 for patients with moderately to severely active Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to the Act on the Reform of the ...

Seaweed menace may yield new medicines

Oct 22, 2014

An invasive seaweed clogging up British coasts could be a blessing in disguise. University of Greenwich scientists have won a cash award to turn it into valuable compounds which can lead to new, life-saving drugs.

User comments