Drug approved to treat high blood pressure

(HealthDay) -- The high blood pressure drug Toprol XL has been combined with a low-dose diuretic to form Dutoprol (metoprolol succinate extended release/hyrdrochlorothiazide), which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat high blood pressure.

Toprol XL has been approved in the United States for 20 years as a treatment for hypertension, British drugmaker AstraZeneca said in a news release.

The drug maker said it will charge $18.33 per month when a 90-day supply of the combination drug is ordered with a valid prescription, whether or not the patient has insurance. Retail drug stores also will stock the combination medication.

AstraZeneca said the drug may not be recommended for people with a significantly slow heart rate, uncontrolled heart failure, or allergies to the drug's ingredients.

More information: Medline Plus has more information about Dutoprol's active ingredient.

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