Drug patch approved for advanced Parkinson's and restless leg syndrome

(HealthDay) -- The Neupro (rotigotine) transdermal system has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced Parkinson's disease and moderate-to-severe restless leg syndrome, the Belgian drug maker UCB said Tuesday in a news release.

The continuous drug delivery patch was first approved by the FDA in 2007 to treat early-stage Parkinson's.

The dopamine agonist skin patch is believed to work by stimulating within the caudate-putamen, the portion of the brain that regulates movement, the company said.

In clinical testing, observed side effects of Neupro included nausea, vomiting, skin site reactions, dizziness, insomnia and headache.

Neupro contains sodium metabisulfite, which could cause deadly allergic-like reactions in certain susceptible people. Also, the drug should not be used by pregnant women, UCB warned.

More information: To learn more about this medication, visit Medline Plus.

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