Insulin resistance cut-off established from clamp data

April 23, 2012
Insulin resistance cut-Off established from clamp data

(HealthDay) -- Cut-offs for predicting insulin resistance based on hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data and routinely measured clinical and biochemical variables have been determined, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care.

To determine a cut-off point for insulin resistance in a white population, Charmaine S. Tam, Ph.D., from the Louisiana State University System in Baton Rouge, and colleagues analyzed data from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (120 mU/m² per minute) for 51 individuals with and 116 individuals without diabetes.

Using the clamp-derived glucose disposal rate (GDR) as a measure of insulin sensitivity, the researchers found that true insulin resistance was present in 75 percent of individuals with a GDR of <5.6 mg/kg fat-free mass (FFM) + 17.7 min. Separate cut-offs were also determined after adjusting for body weight, body surface area, or FFM. Values for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, which is determined from routinely measured clinical and biochemical variables of >5.9 or >2.8 but <5.9 with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <51 mg/dL, predicted insulin resistance with a sensitivity of 89 percent and a specificity of 67 percent.

"We developed a cut-off for defining insulin resistance from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps," Tam and colleagues conclude. "Moreover, we now provide classification trees for predicting from routinely measured clinical and biochemical markers."

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