Low-dose CT noninferior for diagnosing appendicitis

April 26, 2012
Low-Dose CT noninferior for diagnosing appendicitis

(HealthDay) -- For young adults with suspected appendicitis, low-dose computed tomography (CT) is noninferior to standard-dose CT with respect to negative appendectomy rates, according to a study published in the April 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Kyuseok Kim, M.D., from the Seoul National University College of Medicine in South Korea, and colleagues conducted a single-blind noninferiority trial for 891 patients with suspected appendicitis, aged 15 to 44 years. Participants were randomly allocated to low-dose CT (444 patients; median , 116 mGy/cm) or standard-dose CT (447 patients; median radiation dose, 521 mGy/cm). The rate of negative appendectomies was measured, with a noninferiority margin of 5.5 percent.

The researchers found that the negative appendectomy rate was 3.5 and 3.2 percent in the low-dose and standard-dose CT groups, respectively (difference, 0.3 percent). There were no significant between-group differences in the appendiceal perforation rate (26.5 percent for low-dose CT versus 23.3 percent for standard-dose CT; P = 0.46) or in the proportion of patients who required additional imaging (3.2 and 1.6 percent, respectively; P = 0.09).

"We found that the use of low-dose CT as the first-line imaging test was noninferior to standard-dose CT with respect to the negative appendectomy rate among with suspected appendicitis," the authors write.

The study was supported by a grant from GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Korea.

Explore further: Low-dose CT method, delivering 50 percent less radiation, correctly identifies patients with appendicitis

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Zika virus may persist in the vagina days after infection

August 25, 2016

The Zika virus reproduces in the vaginal tissue of pregnant mice several days after infection, according to a study by Yale researchers. From the genitals, the virus spreads and infects the fetal brain, impairing fetal development. ...

In sub-Saharan Africa, cancer can be an infectious disease

August 26, 2016

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. Epstein, an expert in chicken viruses and ...

Team discovers how Zika virus causes fetal brain damage

August 24, 2016

Infection by the Zika virus diverts a key protein necessary for neural cell division in the developing human fetus, thereby causing the birth defect microcephaly, a team of Yale scientists reported Aug. 24 in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.