Waging war against rotavirus

Canada should show leadership in supporting adoption of the rotavirus vaccination in developing countries, but it must also ensure that all Canadian infants are vaccinated against the virus, states an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Rotavirus is the most common cause worldwide of severe diarrhea in babies and young children, resulting in more than 450 000 deaths every year. Most of these deaths are in the developing world.

While Canada supports the provision of the to developing countries through funding of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI), the vaccine is publicly covered in only four Canadian provinces — British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and Prince Edward Island.

"To be true role models, our provincial and federal policymakers must ensure that all Canadian infants are offered vaccination against rotavirus," writes Dr. Ken Flegel, Senior Associate Editor, , with coauthors. "Simultaneously, Canada should ensure the ongoing sustainability of GAVI by guaranteeing our funding despite current economic conditions and by encouraging other developed countries to do the same."

More information: DOI:10.1503/cmaj.120245

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Developing new oral rotavirus vaccine

Mar 26, 2012

The University of Otago is playing a major role in the international development of a new low-cost oral vaccine to protect newborn babies against rotavirus.

Recommended for you

Sierra Leone: WHO too slow to help doc with Ebola

4 hours ago

Sierra Leone accused the World Health Organization on Monday of being "sluggish" in facilitating an evacuation of a doctor who died from Ebola before she could be sent out of the country for medical care.

Dutch doctors feared to have Ebola leave hospital

4 hours ago

Two Dutch doctors flown home from west Africa after fears they might have been contaminated with the killer Ebola virus have left hospital "in good health," their employer, the Lion Heart Medical Centre, said Monday.

Strategic self-sabotage? MRSA inhibits its own growth

9 hours ago

Scientists at the University of Western Ontario have uncovered a bacterial mystery. Against all logic, the most predominant strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in North American produces an enzyme ...

US works to step up Ebola aid, but is it enough?

11 hours ago

The American strategy on Ebola is two-pronged: Step up desperately needed aid to West Africa and, in an unusual step, train U.S. doctors and nurses for volunteer duty in the outbreak zone. At home, the goal ...

User comments