ACOG: Menstrual dysfunction improves post-bariatric surgery

ACOG: menstrual dysfunction improves post-Bariatric surgery

(HealthDay) -- Following bariatric surgery, there is a noticeable improvement seen in menstrual dysfunction and signs of hyperandrogenism, according to a study presented at the annual clinical meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, held from May 5 to 9 in San Diego.

Chandhana Paka, M.D., from St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City, and colleagues investigated the effect of bariatric surgery on menstrual irregularity and signs of hyperandrogenism in 295 women who underwent surgery.

Before surgery, the researchers found that 52.4, 38.9, and 22.4 percent of women had regular menses, irregular menses, and amenorrhea, respectively. At 12-month follow-up, 98.5 percent of women with regular menses experienced no change. Regular menses began in 94 percent of those with previously irregular menses and in 81.8 percent of those with previous . For 86.9 percent of women, the change from irregular or absent menses to regular menses occurred within six months. Before surgery, 31.7 percent of women reported acanthosis nigricans and 33 percent reported excess hair growth. At 12 months, these symptoms improved for 87.5 and 40.5 percent of women, respectively. Complaints of alopecia and acne improved for 52 and 66.7 percent of women, respectively.

"Results show that there is marked improvement in menstrual dysfunction and hyperandrogenism after bariatric surgery," the authors write. "This gives direction for further evaluation of bariatric surgery as a for menstrual dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and associated with ."

More information: Abstract No. 31
More Information

Related Stories

Brain images show menstrual cycle rhythms

date Oct 24, 2005

Cornell University scientists say women with no menstrual mood changes may use parts of their brains differently over the course of their menstrual cycles.

Severe PMS may last longer than thought

date Mar 05, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For years, women with the severe form of premenstrual syndrome known as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) were told that their symptoms should subside the day menstruation begins.

Recommended for you

Self-hypnosis training doesn't cut epidural use

date May 26, 2015

(HealthDay)—Self-hypnosis training does not reduce women's epidural use during childbirth, according to a study published online May 11 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

ACOG urges expedited partner therapy for some STIs

date May 25, 2015

(HealthDay)—For patients with sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as gonorrhea and chlamydia, whose partners are unable or unwilling to seek care, expedited partner therapy can be used to prevent ...

German woman, 65, gives birth to quadruplets

date May 23, 2015

A 65-year-old teacher from Berlin has given birth to quadruplets after a pregnancy that was widely criticized by medical professionals because of her age, RTL television said Saturday.

More evidence C-sections riskier for moms

date May 20, 2015

(HealthDay)—Women who deliver their first baby by cesarean section are more likely to need blood transfusions and be admitted to intensive care units than women who opt for a vaginal delivery, U.S. health ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.