ACOG: Menstrual dysfunction improves post-bariatric surgery

ACOG: menstrual dysfunction improves post-Bariatric surgery

(HealthDay) -- Following bariatric surgery, there is a noticeable improvement seen in menstrual dysfunction and signs of hyperandrogenism, according to a study presented at the annual clinical meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, held from May 5 to 9 in San Diego.

Chandhana Paka, M.D., from St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City, and colleagues investigated the effect of bariatric surgery on menstrual irregularity and signs of hyperandrogenism in 295 women who underwent surgery.

Before surgery, the researchers found that 52.4, 38.9, and 22.4 percent of women had regular menses, irregular menses, and amenorrhea, respectively. At 12-month follow-up, 98.5 percent of women with regular menses experienced no change. Regular menses began in 94 percent of those with previously irregular menses and in 81.8 percent of those with previous . For 86.9 percent of women, the change from irregular or absent menses to regular menses occurred within six months. Before surgery, 31.7 percent of women reported acanthosis nigricans and 33 percent reported excess hair growth. At 12 months, these symptoms improved for 87.5 and 40.5 percent of women, respectively. Complaints of alopecia and acne improved for 52 and 66.7 percent of women, respectively.

"Results show that there is marked improvement in menstrual dysfunction and hyperandrogenism after bariatric surgery," the authors write. "This gives direction for further evaluation of bariatric surgery as a for menstrual dysfunction, hyperandrogenism, and associated with ."

More information: Abstract No. 31
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