Glycemic variability affects mood and quality of life

Glycemic variability affects mood and quality of life

(HealthDay) -- Glycemic variability appears to be associated with lower quality of life and negative moods in women with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the March 30 issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

Sue Penckofer, Ph.D., R.N., of Loyola University Chicago in Maywood, Ill., and colleagues conducted a descriptive, exploratory study involving 23 women with who wore continuous monitors for 72 hours to determine what, if any, impact glycemic variability may have on mood and . Measurements included mood and quality of life questionnaires; glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin and 24-hour mean glucose); and glycemic variability (24-hour standard deviation of the glucose readings, continuous overall net glycemic action, and the rate of change defined as "energy").

The researchers found that, compared with women without depression, those with and comorbid depression had higher anxiety, more anger, and reduced quality of life. After adjusting for age and weight, glycemic variability measures were significantly associated with health-related quality of life. Energy components correlated significantly with depression, trait anxiety, and overall quality of life. High anxiety was associated with steeper glucose excursions.

"The importance of these findings is that anxiety and depression may impact on diabetes self-care behaviors and quality of life, and glycemic variability may be a factor associated with these outcomes," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to Glucose Harmonics.

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