Hair loss pathology identified in pityriasis versicolor lesions

May 23, 2012
Hair loss pathology identified in pityriasis versicolor lesions
Patients with pityriasis versicolor lesions may experience hair thinning and/or loss within the lesion, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- Patients with pityriasis versicolor (PV) lesions may experience hair thinning and/or loss within the lesion, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Wedad Z. Mostafa, M.D., of the Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine at Cairo University, and colleagues examined 39 patients with PV during a period of 11 months. Skin biopsies were taken from both lesional and nonlesional skin to verify and explore the underlying pathology of hair loss in PV.

The researchers found that hair loss and/or thinning within PV lesions most commonly occurred on the forearms, abdomen, neck, and beard area (in males only), and was seen in 61.5 percent of patients. In 46 percent of PV lesions there was evidence of basal hydropic degeneration, follicular degeneration, miniaturization, atrophy, plugging, and/or hair shaft absence, compared with only 20.5 percent of nonlesional biopsy samples. Hair loss within the PV lesions was associated with Malassezia organism presence within the and/or stratum corneum.

"The current study describes for the first time to our knowledge hair thinning or loss in PV and provides evidence on the underlying in the hair follicles," the authors write.

Explore further: Rat hair cells found to be true stem cells

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Rat hair cells found to be true stem cells

October 4, 2005

Cells inside hair follicles are stem cells able to develop into the cell types needed for hair growth and follicle replacement, Swiss researchers claim.

Recommended for you

In sub-Saharan Africa, cancer can be an infectious disease

August 26, 2016

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. Epstein, an expert in chicken viruses and ...

Zika virus may persist in the vagina days after infection

August 25, 2016

The Zika virus reproduces in the vaginal tissue of pregnant mice several days after infection, according to a study by Yale researchers. From the genitals, the virus spreads and infects the fetal brain, impairing fetal development. ...

Team discovers how Zika virus causes fetal brain damage

August 24, 2016

Infection by the Zika virus diverts a key protein necessary for neural cell division in the developing human fetus, thereby causing the birth defect microcephaly, a team of Yale scientists reported Aug. 24 in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.