Phylogenomic analysis reveals origin, spread of MRSA clone

Phylogenomic analysis reveals origin, spread of MRSA clone

(HealthDay) -- Phylogenomic analysis has revealed details about the emergence and transmission of a major methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone, EMRSA-16, according to research published online May 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Paul R. McAdam, from the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, and colleagues performed a Bayesian phylogenetic reconstruction on the basis of genome sequences from 87 Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The isolates were collected from patients in three continents over a 53-year period and included 60 isolates of the pandemic EMRSA-16 clone and 27 additional clonal complex 30 (CC30) isolates.

The researchers found that there was a shared by the three major pandemic clones, originating from the CC30 lineage (phage type 80/81, Southwest Pacific, and EMRSA-16), which existed more than 100 years ago. In contrast, the hospital-associated EMRSA-16 clone likely emerged 35 years ago. A genome-wide analysis of CC30 revealed molecular correlates of hospital- or community-associated pandemics, including mobile genetic elements and nonsynonymous mutations impacting both and virulence. Phylogeographic analysis demonstrated that the spread of EMRSA-16 within the United Kingdom was from hospitals in large population centers in London and Glasgow to regional health care settings.

"Taken together, the high-resolution phylogenomic approach used resulted in a unique understanding of the emergence and transmission of a major MRSA clone and provided molecular correlates of its hospital adaptation," the authors write.

ARK-Genomics at the Roslin Institute performed sequencing services for the study.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study finds fire stations contaminated with MRSA

Jun 01, 2011

MRSA transmission may be occurring in fire stations, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of APIC – the Association for Professionals in Inf ...

MRSA head and neck infections increase among children

Jan 19, 2009

Rates of antibiotic-resistant head and neck infections increased in pediatric patients nationwide between 2001 and 2006, according to a report in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, one of ...

Recommended for you

US looking past Ebola to prepare for next outbreak

6 hours ago

The next Ebola or the next SARS. Maybe even the next HIV. Even before the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is brought under control, U.S. public health officials are girding for the next health disaster.

Can robots help stop the Ebola outbreak?

15 hours ago

The US military has enlisted a new germ-killing weapon in the fight against Ebola—a four-wheeled robot that can disinfect a room in minutes with pulses of ultraviolet light.

New bird flu case in Germany

15 hours ago

A worrying new strain of bird flu has been observed for the first time in a wild bird in northern Germany, the agriculture ministry said Saturday.

Mali announces new Ebola case

Nov 22, 2014

Mali announced Saturday a new case of Ebola in a man who is fighting for his life in an intensive care unit in the capital Bamako.

Plague outbreak kills 40 in Madagascar: WHO

Nov 22, 2014

An outbreak of plague has killed 40 people in Madagascar, the World Health Organization said, warning that the disease could spread rapidly in the country's densely populated capital Antananarivo.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.