Queensland mums to have their say on maternity care

Queensland mums are being given the opportunity to have their voices heard on maternity care in Queensland.

UQ's Queensland Centre for Mothers & Babies is conducting a state-wide survey for to share their experiences – both good and bad – about having a baby in Queensland.

Professor Sue Kruske said the 2012 Having a Baby in Queensland Survey was a valuable way for to help other women who will have babies in the future.

“As new mums, this is your chance to tell your story and make a difference,” Professor Kruske said.

“In particular, we are interested in women's satisfaction with the they receive before, during and after birth and what improvements would enhance their experience.

“The findings from the survey will not only go to the people who make policy decisions, but also your local hospitals and birth centres to celebrate the things that are working well and improve things that may not be working so well.”

Professor Kruske said the survey, distributed in partnership with the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, was one of the largest of its kind in Australia with more than 21,000 mums invited to take part.

“The survey is being rolled out in a number of stages, with mums who gave birth in December and January soon to receive their survey pack,” she said.

“The survey is entirely voluntary, but we hope as many women from as many different backgrounds participate so we can represent as many different experiences as possible.”

She said the survey could be completed in three ways, either by filling out the mailed-out survey, going online at www.havingababy.org.au/yourstory or by freecalling 1800 704 539 during business hours.

Women can also complete the survey over the telephone using a translator if required.

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