Accuracy of melanoma detection up in specialized clinics

Accuracy of melanoma detection up in specialized clinics
From 1998 to 2007, the accuracy of melanoma detection improved in specialized but not non-specialized clinical settings, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- From 1998 to 2007, the accuracy of melanoma detection improved in specialized but not non-specialized clinical settings, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Giuseppe Argenziano, M.D., of Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova in Reggio Emilia, Italy, and colleagues conducted a 10-year, multicenter study of 300,215 cases of excised between 1998 and 2007 to assess the accuracy of melanoma detection at participating clinics. The number needed to excise (NNE) was measured by dividing the number of excised lesions by the number of melanomas, and changes in NNE were assessed over time and between clinical settings.

Overall, a total of 17,172 melanomas and 283,043 melanocytic nevi were identified. The researchers found that in specialized clinical settings the NNE was 8.7, whereas in non-specialized the NNE was 29.4. Over time, the NNE in specialty clinics improved from 12.8 to 6.8 but failed to improve in non-specialty clinics. For patients younger than 40 years and for lesions located on the trunk, higher NNE values were observed.

"Over the 10-year study period, accuracy in melanoma detection improved only in specialized clinics maybe because of a larger use of new such as dermatoscopy," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Larger skin lesions appear more likely to be melanomas

Apr 21, 2008

Skin lesions larger than 6 millimeters in diameter appear more likely to be melanomas than smaller lesions, according to a report in the April issue of Archives of Dermatology. The findings suggest that the diameter guidel ...

Recommended for you

Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers

Nov 21, 2014

New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases was presented today by Dr Anna Sophie Berghoff at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

New model of follow up for breast cancer patients

Nov 21, 2014

Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.