Findings provide guide to decisions on use of slings for women's prolapse surgery

A multicenter study involving a UT Southwestern Medical Center urogynecologist will eliminate some of the guesswork physicians face about whether to use a sling during vaginal prolapse repair to prevent urinary incontinence.

The clinical investigation from eight medical centers across the U.S. provides the first surgical outcome evidence on the benefits and risks of midurethral slings for with vaginal prolapse who show no symptoms of urinary incontinence before surgery.

One in five women will undergo surgery for pelvic organ prolapse, a condition that often causes involuntary loss of urine. Vaginal prolapse can mask urinary incontinence, however, which is why many women do not experience the condition before having surgery.

"This study provides very good data from a blinded, that can be used to counsel patients who are undergoing a vaginal repair for prolapse who don't have symptoms," said Dr. Joseph Schaffer, professor of and a co-author of the study, which appears in the June 21 issue of The .

Slings made out of surgical mesh to support the urethra are the "gold standard" in vaginal prolapse repair surgery to prevent urinary incontinence, Dr. Schaffer said. But complications of sling placement over time can include decreased bladder emptying and voiding dysfunction, or the inability to empty the bladder normally.

Not every woman who has a sling placed will ultimately need it. Dr. Schaffer said this study, which is part of the collaborative Pelvic Floor Disorders Network, provides solid numbers to the risk outcome of sling placement. It will help physicians counsel women who don't have incontinence before surgery but who want to avoid bothersome postoperative symptoms of the condition.

"Although many women without preoperative incontinence do not develop it after prolapse surgery, many women do develop it," he said. "For some women, the benefits of avoiding urinary incontinence outweigh the chance that the sling procedure would not have been necessary. It's still a difficult decision, but now we have solid data to base it on. This is really good evidence to help guide the decision."

Pelvic organ prolapse is a condition in which the uterus, bladder or vagina protrude from the body and creates pressure that often causes involuntary loss of urine. For women with vaginal prolapse, a cough or sneeze pushes the prolapse out and blocks the urine from leaking, Dr. Schaffer said.

"But when you do a prolapse repair, it pushes everything back in, and you can unmask potential incontinence," he said.

In the study, 337 participants presenting with repair between May 2007 and October 2009 received either a midurethral sling or sham incisions, which mimic the sling incisions. Investigators tested women pre-operatively for urine leakage during coughing or straining. They followed up at three and 12 months with a cough stress test, urinalysis and post-void residual measurements.

Three months after surgery, nearly a quarter of the sling group had , compared to nearly half of the control group. The sling's beneficial effect remained significant at 12 months, the researchers reported.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers offer hope to prolapse sufferers

May 17, 2011

Scientists in Scandinavia have found a new way to treat sufferers of pelvic organ prolapse. Presented in the New England Journal of Medicine, their study reveals that the use of synthetic mesh can have a more ...

Recommended for you

Vitamin D may not prevent return of vaginosis after all

Oct 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—A new study suggests that high doses of vitamin D may not help prevent the return of bacterial vaginosis (BV). The research was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Eating disorders linked to adverse perinatal outcomes

Oct 22, 2014

(HealthDay)—Maternal eating disorders are associated with adverse pregnancy, obstetric, and perinatal health outcomes, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.