Study: Insomnia linked to hypertension

June 6, 2012

People with insomnia may now have one more thing to keep them up at night: an increased likelihood of developing hypertension, according to a study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

Researchers at the Henry Ford Center for found that the prevalence of hypertension was greater in insomniacs compared to normal sleepers.

"The cause of hypertension in insomniacs is due to the number of times the individual wakes during the night as well as their sleep latency – the length of time it takes to accomplish the transition from full wakefulness to sleep," says Christopher Drake, associate scientist at the Henry Ford Hospital Sleep Disorders and Research Center and lead author of this study.

"We found that the longer it took the subjects to fall asleep and more times they woke during the night, the more severe their hypertension."

The study will be presented Tuesday, June 12 at the Sleep 2012 Conference in Boston.

Insomnia is the inability to fall asleep or remain asleep and is the most common sleep complaint among Americans. According to the National Center for Sleep Disorders Research at the National Institutes of Health, about 30 to 40 percent of adults say they have some symptoms of insomnia within a given year, and about 10 to 15 percent of adults say they have chronic insomnia.

The Henry Ford study compared 5314 subjects with insomnia to those with normal sleep habits using an internet-based questionnaire. The questionnaire looked for patterns of symptoms, presence and severity of hypertension and and health habits. The normal were then compared to insomniacs for prevalence of .

Related Stories

Study: Insomnia takes toll on tinnitus patients

April 19, 2012

For the more than 36 million people plagued by tinnitus, insomnia can have a negative effect on the condition, worsening the functional and emotional toll of chronic ringing, buzzing, hissing or clicking in the head and ears, ...

Recommended for you

Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies

July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. ...

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.