Head lice beginning to show permethrin resistance

Head lice beginning to show permethrin resistance
Although live head lice obtained from school-aged children in Paris remain susceptible to the insecticide malathion, approximately 14 percent have been found to be resistant to permethrin, suggesting a strong basis for future insecticide resistance, according to research published online May 24 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- Although live head lice obtained from school-aged children in Paris remain susceptible to the insecticide malathion, approximately 14 percent have been found to be resistant to permethrin, suggesting a strong basis for future insecticide resistance, according to research published online May 24 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Sophie Bouvresse, M.D., of the Henri Mondor Hospital in Paris, and colleagues conducted a prospective, population-based observational study of 14,436 school-aged children from 74 elementary schools to evaluate the occurrence of permethrin- and malathion-resistant head lice.

Live head lice were found in 574 children. The researchers observed that no lice survived after one hour of malathion treatment, while 85.7 percent of lice died after a one-hour exposure to permethrin and piperonyl butoxide. Of the 670 lice for which DNA could be studied, 98.7 percent were homozygous for the kdr mutation, which confers resistance to permethrin, suggesting a strongly-established in this population.

"Further studies are necessary to identify all contributors to pyrethroid resistance, such as head louse attributes and possible host factors," the authors write. "Long-term surveillance of insecticidal resistance could be important to guide for head lice."

Two authors disclosed to pharmaceutical companies.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Body lice originate from head lice

Mar 25, 2010

Body lice, which cause highly lethal epidemics (trench fever, typhus and relapsing fever Borrelia), originate from head lice. This has recently been shown by a team from the Emerging Infectious and Tropical Diseases Research ...

'LouseBuster' Instrument Shown to Kill Head Lice

Nov 06, 2006

Biologists have invented a chemical-free, hairdryer-like device - the LouseBuster - and conducted a study showing it eradicates head lice infestations on children by exterminating the eggs, or "nits," and killing ...

Recommended for you

Kidney-brain connection may help drive chronic kidney disease

9 hours ago

In addition to affecting blood pressure, high-salt intake can promote kidney function decline in patients with chronic kidney disease. A study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (J ...

Flu's grip on U.S. starting to weaken: CDC

10 hours ago

(HealthDay)—After a rough start to the flu season, the number of infections seems to have peaked and is even starting to decline in many parts of the nation, federal health officials reported Thursday.

Litchi fruit suspected in mystery illness in India

10 hours ago

A mysterious and sometimes fatal brain disease that has afflicted children in northeastern India for years could be linked to a toxic substance in litchi fruits, US researchers said Thursday.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.