Marker helps predict thrombotic risk of hormonal contraceptives

Marker helps predict thrombotic risk of hormonal contraceptives
For women taking hormonal contraceptives, sex hormone-binding globulin is a useful marker to estimate the risk of venous thrombosis, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

(HealthDay) -- For women taking hormonal contraceptives, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a useful marker to estimate the risk of venous thrombosis, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

To assess whether SHBG is useful as a marker for thrombotic risk, Marjolein Raps, M.D., of the Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted an observational study involving 262 users of different contraceptives. SHBG levels were measured and compared with normalized activated protein C sensitivity ratio (nAPCsr) values and thrombosis risks reported in the literature.

The researchers found that, compared with users of combined contraceptives containing , which have a lower thrombosis risk, higher SHBG levels were seen in women taking containing desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or , or using a transdermal patch, all of which carry a higher risk of venous thrombosis. SHBG levels were highest in users of the patch. SHBG levels correlated positively with both the nAPCsr and with thrombosis risks reported in recent literature.

"In conclusion, our data support the idea that SHBG could be a useful marker for estimating the risk of venous thrombosis of a new hormonal contraceptive," the authors write. "Preferably, the effect of a new hormonal contraceptive on SHBG should be compared with the effect of the combined hormonal contraceptive with the lowest reported risk of venous ."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Minor leg injuries associated with risk of blood clots

Jan 14, 2008

Muscle ruptures, ankle sprains and other common minor leg injuries appear to be associated with a higher risk for blood clots in the legs or lungs, according to a report in the January 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, ...

Recommended for you

Where Ebola battles are won

5 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Four hospitals that are home to advanced biocontainment facilities have become America's ground zero in the treatment of Ebola patients.

Depression tied to worse lumbar spine surgery outcomes

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Depressive symptoms are associated with poorer long-term outcome in patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of The Sp ...

Ebola death toll edging to 4,900 mark: WHO

8 hours ago

The death toll in the world's worst-ever Ebola outbreak has edged closer to 4,900, while almost 10,000 people have now been infected, new figures from the World Health Organization showed Wednesday.

US to track everyone coming from Ebola nations

9 hours ago

U.S. authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the U.S. from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. That includes returning American aid workers, federal health employees ...

User comments